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Leading experts weigh in on current policy issues and challenges
POLICY DEBATE

Helping People Advance Beyond an Entry-Level Job

How can policy—within government, institutions, organizations, and industry—better support career advancement?

Featuring the following Experts:

Sam Berndt, Scott Cheney, Jaime Fall, Dawn Medley, Judy Mortrude, Jennie Sparandara

Lauren Eyster
Moderated by:
Lauren Eyster
Senior Fellow, Income and Benefits Policy Center
21
leyster's picture

We are bringing our policy debate to a close. Thanks to the experts who posted such thoughtful comments throughout the three-day debate about how policy can better support career advancement. Some of the key ideas offered by our experts include...

POLICY DEBATE

Revisiting Housing Finance: Why a Federal Role?

How should the federal government support housing—both homeownership and rental—for those the market will not?

Featuring the following Experts:

Mike Calhoun, Laurie Goodman, Tim Howard, Shekar Narasimhan, Ed Pinto, Rob Randhava, Lisa Rice, Mark Zandi, Barry Zigas

Ellen Seidman
Moderated by:
Ellen Seidman
Non-Resident Fellow, Urban Institute
42
eseidman's picture

Housing finance reform is the open business from the housing and financial crises of 10 years ago.  While conservatorship has brought stability, and even some innovation, as our Debaters have pointed out, we continue to face a housing finance...

POLICY DEBATE

Meeting Community Needs: The Promise of Community Development Financial Institutions

Meeting today's challenges will require CDFIs to build on their traditions of social justice, compassion, and financial professionalism, while maximizing their creativity, resilience, and ability to build coalitions and partnerships and shape policy at the federal, state, and local levels.  

Featuring the following Experts:

Janis Bowdler, Bill Bynum, Elyse Cherry, Dan Kildee, Brett Theodos, Luz Urrutia, Jennifer Vasiloff

Ellen Seidman
Moderated by:
Ellen Seidman
Non-Resident Fellow, Urban Institute
24
eseidman's picture

Many, many thanks to all our debaters (so sorry we lost Elyse to a broken arm—hope you feel better, Elyse!).  And thanks also to the Urban comms team, especially Nicole Levins, who made participating in the debate easy and painless. I urge...

Policy Debate

How to Think About Personal Giving Capacity

Scholars and practitioners are now casting fresh light on the question of how individuals’ sense of personal wealth, well-being, and resource capacity shape their giving decisions. Instead of simply considering how to increase the aggregate totals of individual giving – the persistent 2% of our national GDP – we must consider more critically how we might expand the base out of which giving could be taken at an individual level. How do objective and subjective measures of personal giving potential relate? What is the relationship between understandings of personal and communal charitable capacity? Are there policy or behavioral measures that could be taken to increase these measures?

Featuring the following Experts:

Gasby Brown, Angela Eikenberry, PhD, Jonathan Meer, PhD, Melinda Rolfs, Piyush Tantia

Benjamin Soskis, PhD
Moderated by:
Benjamin Soskis, PhD
Research Associate, Center on Nonprofits and Philanthropy at the Urban Institute
20
bsoskis's picture

Thanks again to all those who participated in this Urban Policy Debate. Our focus was on personal giving capacity and it was striking to see the various approaches and perspectives that we took in our posts to engage that theme. We addressed both...

Policy Debate

Should State and Local Governments Use Pay for Success Financing to Support Medication-Assisted Treatment (MAT) for Opioid-Use Disorder?

The increasing rate of opioid use disorder and overdose deaths has become a national opioid crisis, which has further increased pressure for policy-makers to “just do something.” However, the opioid crisis is complicated, and it isn’t always clear how state and local governments can improve the situations people are facing.

Pay for Success (PFS) is an innovative financing model that allows state and local governments to ensure their scarce resources are used for programs that actually improve people’s lives. As one of the only evidence-based solutions available to help address the opioid crisis, implementing Medication-Assisted Treatment (MAT) through PFS financing may be an effective means for jurisdictions to “do something” that improves the situation. However, successful PFS projects also involve requirements that are not well-suited to every program.

This debate brings together policy researchers, medical practitioners, decision-makers, and PFS experts to discuss and debate whether state and/or local governments could (or should) use PFS to implement MAT as an approach to address the opioid crisis in their jurisdictions.

Featuring the following Experts:

Lisa Clemans-Cope, Don Teater MD, MPH, Sally Satel MD, Kelly Walsh, Jake Edwards, Mireille Jacobson, Cheryl Burnett

Dave McClure
Moderated by:
Dave McClure
Research Associate
25
KellyWalsh's picture

Everyone here makes great points about the suitability of PFS to support OAT.  Alignment between an intervention and the PFS model is just one consideration when someone is trying to figure out if PFS is right for their community.   Other...