This chartbook presents a comprehensive overview of the local housing market in Newark, New Jersey’s nine zipcodes based on data from the American Community Survey, CoreLogic’s Market Trends and the Bureau of Labor Statistics Employment Situation Report. The report includes comparison data on the United States, the state of New Jersey, Essex County and six other US cities: Camden, Jersey City and Trenton, NJ and

September 18, 2020
Research Report
 

The Census Bureau’s Household Pulse Survey offers a snapshot of how the COVID-19 pandemic and recession affected households as the recession extended into the summer and millions of adults remained unemployed. We use the Household Pulse Survey to measure changes in insurance coverage between April 23–May 12 and July 9–21, 2020 and better understand how the recession impacted insurance coverage. We find that

September 18, 2020
Brief
 

In 2014, Kentucky fundamentally transformed its juvenile justice system with the goal of improving outcomes for youth and families, protecting public safety, and controlling youth corrections costs. Among other changes, comprehensive reform legislation (Senate Bill 200) expanded and enhanced the state’s precourt diversion process administered by the Administrative Office of the Courts (AOC). The new law required

September 17, 2020
Research Report
 

In this brief, we present new research estimating New Mexico’s nonelderly uninsured population in 2020, as well as new analyses of seven reform options intended to increase health coverage and improve affordability.  We estimate that the COVID-19 recession has increased the number of uninsured New Mexicans relative to a year ago. As recent increases in Medicaid, CHIP, and Marketplace coverage indicate,

September 16, 2020
Research Report
 

The social determinants of health, and the structural inequities that influence them, create a disproportional effect on the health and well-being of people with low incomes and communities of color. Collaborations across organizations and sectors are important to address the social determinants of health. This brief explains how cross-sector partnerships can help; describes the significant role of locally

September 16, 2020
Brief
 

Addressing a national housing crisis—the mismatch between the supply and demand of rental homes for households with modest incomes—requires a comprehensive strategy to produce new affordable units, preserve existing inventory, and protect at-risk residents. Because more affordable units are lost than are produced, preservation must be a higher priority in this strategy. This essay proposes such a robust

September 14, 2020
Brief
 

Since late 2017, the Urban Institute’s Housing Opportunities and Services Together team has partnered with public housing authority BangorHousing and the Boys & Girls Club of Bangor, Maine, in a formative evaluation of Families Forward, a locally designed and funded two-generation program that builds on BangorHousing’s Family Self-Sufficiency Program. Our initial findings show that families enrolled in

September 14, 2020
Research Report
 

Public policies have long played a central role in creating and perpetuating residential segregation by contributing to disinvestment and neglect in neighborhoods where people of color and lower-income families live and blocking access to well-resourced and opportunity-rich neighborhoods. The cumulative effects of these policy decisions are vividly seen and painfully felt today. Communities of color have been

September 9, 2020
Brief
 

This guide is meant to assist community-based organizations that are interested in facilitating remote community engagement activities. Although the guide was developed as a response to the COVID-19 pandemic, it can also be used by organizations looking to broaden their outreach strategy generally. In this guide, we present a list of tools that can be used for facilitating remote community engagement activities

September 8, 2020
Research Report
 

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) is on the verge of revising the qualified mortgage (QM) rule by proposing to move away from a debt-to-income-centric rule to one based on pricing. This change will meaningfully expand access to credit for first-time homebuyers and minorities, while keeping defaults low. At the same time, the proposed price caps for safe harbor and qualified mortgages will prove

September 4, 2020
Brief
 

Although the number of youth in out-of-home placements has dropped dramatically over the past decade, racial and ethnic disparities in youth incarceration have increased. As a result, the lasting consequences of juvenile justice system involvement disproportionately affect youth of color. Some reform efforts, therefore, emphasize racial and ethnic equity and inclusion (REEI) in addition to reducing general

September 3, 2020
Brief
 

Probation plays a critical role in the juvenile justice system, but the absence of clear intended outcomes for youth who are justice involved might contribute to the unnecessary use of judicial dispositions to probation and out-of-home placement, as well as to high rates of recidivism. In this brief, we describe findings from a developmental evaluation of the Annie E. Casey Foundation’s expansion of the Juvenile

September 3, 2020
Brief
 

Partnering with youth and families involved in the juvenile justice system can promote positive youth outcomes and help youth avoid further system involvement. In this brief, we describe findings from a developmental evaluation of the Annie E. Casey Foundation’s expansion of the Juvenile Detention Alternative Initiative® to the deep end of the juvenile justice system. Deep-end reform aims to safely and

September 3, 2020
Brief
 

Data can motivate and inform the development of juvenile justice reform efforts. Data are also essential for understanding the potential influence of reform activities, learning about what is working well, identifying racial and ethnic disparities, and strengthening policy and practice. In this brief, we describe how jurisdictions involved in a juvenile justice reform effort identified and addressed their data

September 3, 2020
Brief
 

Funded and supported by the Annie E. Casey Foundation, several communities across the US have undertaken deep-end reform designed to safely and significantly reduce juvenile out-of-home placement, especially for youth of color. From 2013 through 2018, the Foundation funded a developmental evaluation of this reform to better understand what worked well, what could be improved, and lessons for the field. During

September 3, 2020
Research Report
 

As states and territories make decisions about child care policies, they may find it useful to collect data from child care providers. Survey data can be helpful for answering questions about providers’ characteristics and experiences. Yet surveys can be difficult to design. This brief discusses best practices for developing and testing surveys. A one-page tip sheet lists suggestions for writing strong survey

September 3, 2020
Brief
 

The Urban Institute's Medicare policy microsimulation model, MCARE-SIM, was designed to estimate the effects of potential policy reforms for Medicare enrollees. Microsimulation models typically combine multiple data sources to produce a current picture of enrollment, household spending, and government spending under current law. In this methodological brief, we describe the set of available estimates for

September 2, 2020
Brief
 

This brief presents what we know about housing’s effects on education and examines local efforts to improve educational outcomes by ensuring the quality, affordability, or stability of students’ housing. It also discusses the structural barriers to housing stability and educational resources by examining the ways in which the education and housing systems are aligned to limit opportunity for people of color and

September 1, 2020
Brief
 

Although older adults have made significant financial gains over the past generation, many experience economic hardship. In 2017, 14 percent of adults ages 65 and older had incomes below 125 percent of the federal poverty level, and 37 percent had incomes below 250 percent of that level. Low-income elders have little wealth to help meet spending needs dominated by housing and healthcare costs. These financial

August 31, 2020
Journal Article
 

This brief presents results from a baseline survey of custodial and non-custodial parents enrolled in the Fathers Advancing Community Together (FACT) program offered by Rubicon Programs in Contra Costa County, California. FACT is a multi-faceted program designed to deliver responsible parenting, healthy relationships, and economic stability services on a voluntary basis to low-income fathers. Our survey findings

August 28, 2020
Brief
 

The uncertainties and changes associated with military life can adversely impact families with young children. Home visitors can help military families manage stressors and engage in positive and responsive interactions with children, thus supporting development and reducing child maltreatment. This Data in Action Brief uses data from the US Census Bureau, supplemented by a literature review of military

August 28, 2020
Brief
 

Economic trends have made postsecondary education increasingly important to self-sufficiency, but research suggests that far too many young people in foster care will not have the educational credentials needed to succeed in this economy without additional supports. Specifically, young people in foster care enroll in college at lower rates than their peers and are less likely to persist through the end of their

August 28, 2020
Brief
 

Heading into this crisis, Black and Hispanic homeowners accrued a smaller financial benefit from homeownership than White homeowners. Homeowners of color typically had lower housing equity, because they purchased homes of lower value with higher mortgage debt later in life. They also had marginally higher costs associated with homeownership, largely due to the greater preponderance of mortgages and slightly

August 28, 2020
Research Report
 

We compare four studies that project the effects of the COVID-19 recession on employment-based health insurance coverage and the number of uninsured people in 2020. Several estimates have been published in recent months, but they vary widely and are difficult to reconcile. Most workers in the United States get health insurance coverage through their jobs, so policymakers are looking for answers to two main

August 28, 2020
Brief
 

The challenges surrounding the COVID-19 pandemic and ensuing economic crisis are disproportionately affecting many immigrant workers and families across the US. An array of barriers, such as program eligibility rules and lack of language access, put federal, state, and local relief programs out of reach for many families. Community-based organizations (CBOs) serving immigrants with low incomes are on the front

August 27, 2020
Brief