Expanding access to effective treatment for opioid use disorder (OUD) is essential to staunching the opioid epidemic. This brief is one of the first studies to assess patient access to treatment services for OUD at facilities that offer OUD pharmacotherapy across New Jersey. We conducted phone surveys in 2018 with substance use treatment facilities in New Jersey. This brief presents data about specific treatment service

September 18, 2019
Brief
 

The January 2021 GSE patch expiration is an opportunity to update the qualified mortgage (QM) rule to make it work better for future borrowers. Evidence presented in this brief shows that the debt-to-income (DTI) ratio is a weaker predictor of default than other risk measures and that its centrality to the current QM rule distorts the market by misrepresenting true loan risk. We recommend that the Consumer Financial Protection

September 17, 2019
Public Comment
 

Public spending on children aims to support their healthy development and help them fulfill their human potential. As such, federal spending on children is an investment in the nation’s future. To inform policymakers, children’s advocates, and the general public about how public funds are spent on children, this 13th edition of the annual Kids’ Share report provides an updated analysis of federal expenditures on children from

September 17, 2019
Research Report
 

This report tells the story of the first 30 years of Mary’s Center, documenting its evolution from a basement clinic to a nationally recognized federally qualified health center serving nearly 55,000 participants in 2018. Mary’s Center’s ongoing experience provides a useful framework for understanding the benefits and opportunities of providing comprehensive medical, social, and educational services in underresourced communities

September 16, 2019
Research Report
 

This brief explores state variation in health insurance coverage changes during implementation of the primary health insurance coverage reforms of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) using data from the 2013 and 2017 American Community Survey. We summarize this state variation using a typology that groups states according to their pre-ACA uninsurance levels, Medicaid expansion status, and efforts to encourage marketplace enrollment.

September 13, 2019
Brief
 

Youth are valuable assets to their communities; however, they are often left out of decisionmaking and go unheard. Local organizations in the National Neighborhood Indicators Partnership are taking innovative approaches to introducing youth to the power of data and ways to leverage information to advocate for the change they want in their communities. They demonstrate the range of ways to support youth voices—from training

September 13, 2019
Brief
 

To improve the finances of the Teacher Retirement System of Texas, which serves almost 1.5 million workers and retirees, Texas Governor Greg Abbott signed legislation in spring 2019 that gradually raises plan contributions by the state, school districts, and employees. Additional contribution hikes may be necessary to close the plan’s funding gap, however, if optimistic actuarial and investment assumptions about the future fail

September 13, 2019
Research Report
 

If the administration’s proposed changes to broad-based categorical eligibility (BBCE) in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) are implemented, about 1.3 million people in working families would no longer meet SNAP’s income test, and724,000 people would not pass its asset test. This means a little more than 2 million people in working families would lose access to an average monthly SNAP benefit of $150 per

September 12, 2019
Brief
 

If the administration’s proposed changes to broad-based categorical eligibility in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) are implemented, about 434,000 people in households with a senior would no longer meet SNAP’s income test, and 323,000 would not pass its asset test. These people would lose access to an average monthly SNAP benefit of $68 per household, reducing benefits by over $42 million annually. About 231,

September 12, 2019
Brief
 

If the administration’s proposed changes to broad-based categorical eligibility in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) are implemented, 1.1 million people in households with children would no longer meet SNAP’s income test, and 1 million would live in households no longer passing its asset test. This means over 2 million people in households with children would lose access to an average monthly SNAP benefit of $

September 12, 2019
Brief
 

Half of all pregnancies in the United States are unplanned. Women faced with an unplanned pregnancy might consider parenting, adoption, and abortion. Currently, access to abortion is under threat in the United States, with many states implementing bans on abortions using particular methods or after a certain point in pregnancy, bans based on the reason a person is seeking an abortion, and policies designed to force clinics that

September 12, 2019
Brief
 

New Jersey has enacted an incremental minimum-wage increase from $8.85 in 2019 to $15 by 2024. Though some workers could lose Medicaid eligibility under the wage increase, our findings suggest loss of Medicaid eligibility and coverage will likely be small relative to the number of workers likely to experience a wage increase. We find this minimum-wage increase would raise earnings for 810,000 nondisabled citizen workers in New

September 12, 2019
Brief
 

Between 2013 and 2017, the share of children whose families had problems paying medical bills declined by 20 percent, but one in six children (an estimated 13.0 million) still lived in a family with problems paying medical bills in 2017. Low-income children were more likely than higher-income children to live in families with problems paying medical bills, and four in five low-income children in families with such problems had

September 11, 2019
Brief
 

State Refugee Coordinators (SRCs) oversee a portfolio of programs and services for refugees and other humanitarian entrants. This Toolkit provides ideas for SRCs to strengthen their ability to gather and use data to understand how programs are functioning and how clients are faring. We offer lessons from leading SRCs on how to leverage data from required reporting forms, design and build integrated databases, and deploy other

September 11, 2019
Research Report
 

The partner organizations in the National Neighborhood Indicators Partnership are playing a crucial role in providing support for a complete count in the 2020 Census. The stakes are high because the census determines the political representation and federal funding for localities. All Partners are embedded in communities as trusted collaborators and plan to participate in 2020 Census efforts. They are leveraging their knowledge

September 10, 2019
Fact Sheet
 

This paper uses a large panel of transaction-level capital asset sales data to investigate whether tax responsiveness varies with economic conditions. We estimate the tax elasticity associated with a large notch in the capital gains tax schedule, when the tax treatment changes from higher, ordinary income tax rates to lower, preferential tax rates. We estimate this elasticity for each year from 2007 to 2012. Surprisingly, these

September 10, 2019
Research Report
 

The August 19, 2019 Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) from the US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) seeks to revise the existing Fair Housing Act standard for redressing systemic housing discrimination. Unfortunately, HUD’s proposal gives the upper hand to those defending potentially discriminatory housing practices and essentially creates a safe harbor or exemption from disparate impact liability for the

September 6, 2019
Brief
 

Since 2009, New York City has implemented the Jobs-Plus program to increase employment and earnings public housing residents. The program is modeled after a successful federal demonstration from the 1990s that combines employment services, financial incentives, and community supports to promote work. The Urban Institute evaluation of the program combined interviews and focus groups with staff and participants with analysis of

September 6, 2019
Research Report
 

Modeling Income in the Near Term (MINT) is a dynamic microsimulation model developed by the Social Security Administration to facilitate analysis of proposals to change Social Security benefits and payroll taxes. This primer describes MINT’s development history. It then details the model’s starting sample and the specification of its demographic and economic aging modules, including the calculators that compute various benefits

September 5, 2019
Research Report
 

In this report, we examine the different ways that Roth individual retirement accounts (IRAs) and traditional IRAs affect their investors and the government. People who want to shelter more income per dollar deposited in the account, provide larger bequests, or eliminate uncertainty about how withdrawals will be taxed will find Roth accounts more attractive (other factors held equal). From the government’s perspective, however,

September 5, 2019
Research Report
 

An update to the previously published Teen Food Literacy Curriculum, this document provides detailed discussion guides and instructions for facilitating a 16-session course intended to teach leadership skills to teens through the lens of food literacy and advocacy. The course was originally developed in Portland, Oregon, as part of a program that engaged teens, service providers, and researchers to design and pilot a program to

September 5, 2019
Research Report
 

This implementation plan describes the work done by the Urban Institute Housing Opportunities and Services Together (HOST) team to pilot a Teen Food Literacy Program in Chicago’s Altgeld Gardens, a public housing development. Using lessons learned and a previous program in Portland, Oregon, as a template, Urban received support from the Chicago Community Trust to help coordinate a pilot of a teen-focused intervention to reduce

September 5, 2019
Research Report
 

In May 2018, we released a paper describing a comprehensive health insurance reform program called Healthy America. Healthy America (HA) is a hybrid reform approach that uses purchasing leverage to reduce health care prices while improving federal subsidies to provide reduced premium and cost-sharing options for many Americans. The combined reforms could bring the United States close to universal coverage while decreasing

September 4, 2019
Brief