Individual development accounts (IDAs) help low-income families save by matching their personal savings for specific investments, such as a first home, business capitalization, or higher education and training. The Assets for Independence (AFI) program, last funded in fiscal year 2016, is a federally supported IDA demonstration grant program authorized under the Assets for Independence Act of 1998. This evaluation of the AFI

November 15, 2019
Research Report
 

Denver’s expansion of supportive housing through the Denver Supportive Housing Social Impact Bond Initiative is beginning to pay off for the city of Denver, its homeless residents, and a group of investors banking on social impact. This fact sheet highlights interim results for the third year of the program.

November 12, 2019
Fact Sheet
 

In February 2016, the City and County of Denver and eight private investors closed on the city’s first social impact bond, an $8.6 million investment to fund a supportive housing program for 250 of the city’s most frequent users of the criminal justice system. The city will make outcome payments over five years based on the initiative’s goals of housing stability and a decrease in days spent in jail by participants. This report

November 12, 2019
Research Report
 

In February 2016, the City and County of Denver and eight private investors closed on the city’s first social impact bond, an $8.6 million investment to fund a supportive housing program for 250 of the city’s most frequent users of the criminal justice system. The city will make outcome payments over five years based on the initiative’s goals of housing stability and a decrease in days spent in jail by participants. This report

November 12, 2019
Brief
 

After this brief was published in August, we noticed an error in the statistical code used to create the concept scales. This error underestimated scale values for respondents who did not answer all survey questions for a concept, such as perceptions of police legitimacy. It was especially problematic when a respondent did not answer any questions for a concept: the summated value and the scale value were zero, which is outside

November 11, 2019
Brief
 

The National Neighborhood Indicators Partnership (NNIP) is committed to ensuring that all communities have access to data and the skills to use that data to advance equity and well-being across neighborhoods. We recognize that organizations that reflect the diversity in their communities and are inclusive of all people produce higher-quality analysis and stronger collaborations, and, ultimately, they expand the influence we have

November 11, 2019
Brief
 

Paying credit card, mortgage, or student loan debt late damages a person’s financial health. This brief uses the 2015 FINRA Foundation National Financial Capability Study data to estimate the relationship between financial knowledge and past-due credit card, mortgage, and student loan debt. According to our analysis, financially knowledgeable adults are less likely to be past due on credit card, mortgage, or student loan

November 8, 2019
Brief
 

The Adaptive Learning in Statistics (ALiS) Project tested the implementation of an adaptive learning platform at nine colleges in Maryland. The platform served as a textbook replacement to introduce course concepts inside and outside of the classroom, and instructors used in-class time to reinforce statistics concepts as part of a flipped classroom approach. This report describes study results from the 2017/18 academic year. The

November 7, 2019
Research Report
 

In 10 major US cities, financially insecure families are prevalent, and residents’ financial insecurity affects city budgets. In 2019, the costs to cities range from between $6 and $14 million in Miami to between $534 million and $1,232 million in New York City. In Miami, the costs range from $6 to $14 million, suggesting that Miami, like other cities, has an economic interest in improving residents’ financial health. Analyses

November 6, 2019
Brief
 

In 10 major US cities, financially insecure families are prevalent, and residents’ financial insecurity affects city budgets. In 2019, the costs to cities range from between $6 and $14 million in Miami to between $534 million and $1,232 million in New York City. In New Orleans, the costs range from $13 to $30 million, suggesting that New Orleans, like other cities, has an economic interest in improving residents’ financial

November 6, 2019
Brief
 

In 10 major US cities, financially insecure families are prevalent, and residents’ financial insecurity affects city budgets. In 2019, the costs to cities range from between $6 and $14 million in Miami to between $534 million and $1,232 million in New York City. This suggests that New York, like other cities, has an economic interest in improving residents’ financial health. Analyses of residents’ credit health and debt can

November 6, 2019
Brief
 

In 10 major US cities, financially insecure families are prevalent, and residents’ financial insecurity affects city budgets. In 2019, the costs to cities range from between $6 and $14 million in Miami to between $534 million and $1,232 million in New York City. In San Francisco, the costs range from $30 and $70 million, suggesting that San Francisco, like other cities, has an economic interest in improving residents’ financial

November 6, 2019
Brief
 

In 10 major US cities, financially insecure families are prevalent, and residents’ financial insecurity affects city budgets. In 2019, the costs to cities range from between $6 and $14 million in Miami to between $534 million and $1,232 million in New York City. In Seattle, the costs range from $26 and $60 million, suggesting that Seattle, like other cities, has an economic interest in improving residents’ financial health.

November 6, 2019
Brief
 

In 10 major US cities, financially insecure families are prevalent, and residents’ financial insecurity affects city budgets. In 2019, the costs to cities range from between $6 and $14 million in Miami to between $534 million and $1,232 million in New York City. In Chicago, the costs range from $68 to $157 million, suggesting that Chicago, like other cities, has an economic interest in improving residents’ financial health.

November 6, 2019
Brief
 

In 10 major US cities, financially insecure families are prevalent, and residents’ financial insecurity affects city budgets. In 2019, the costs to cities range from between $6 and $14 million in Miami to between $534 million and $1,232 million in New York City. In Columbus, the costs range from $17 to $39 million, suggesting that Columbus, like other cities, has an economic interest in improving residents’ financial health.

November 6, 2019
Brief
 

In 10 major US cities, financially insecure families are prevalent, and residents’ financial insecurity affects city budgets. In 2019, the costs to cities range from between $6 and $14 million in Miami to between $534 million and $1,232 million in New York City. In Dallas, the costs range from $30 to $69 million, suggesting that Dallas, like other cities, has an economic interest in improving residents’ financial health.

November 6, 2019
Brief
 

In 10 major US cities, financially insecure families are prevalent, and residents’ financial insecurity affects city budgets. In 2019, the costs to cities range from between $6 and $14 million in Miami to between $534 million and $1,232 million in New York City. In Houston, the costs range from $39 to $90 million, suggesting that Houston, like other cities, has an economic interest in improving residents’ financial health.

November 6, 2019
Brief
 

In 10 major US cities, financially insecure families are prevalent, and residents’ financial insecurity affects city budgets. In 2019, the costs to cities range from between $6 and $14 million in Miami to between $534 million and $1,232 million in New York City. In Los Angeles, the costs range from $107 to $248 million, suggesting that Los Angeles, like other cities, has an economic interest in improving residents’ financial

November 6, 2019
Brief
 

State and local governments have adopted many strategies to address underfunding in their pension plans, including reducing benefits for new hires through changes to critical plan rules and provisions. In this brief, we examine the size of these changes for the millions of state and local workers whose jobs are not covered by Social Security. Overall, we find that newly hired workers in 2018 face greater burdens in financing

November 1, 2019
Brief
 

This brief describes how Promise Neighborhoods can apply an equity lens to address disparate outcomes as a path to achieving better results for all children and families. Promise Neighborhoods is a federal initiative that aims to improve the educational and developmental outcomes of children and families in diverse communities, including urban neighborhoods, rural areas, and tribal lands. Effective Promise Neighborhoods follow a

October 31, 2019
Brief
 

ObjectivesExamine how the amount and makeup of police-initiated activities changed after the introduction of body-worn cameras (BWCs). MethodsFrom May 21 to November 22, 2016, patrol officers and sergeants from the Milwaukee Police Department were involved in a randomized controlled trial. Through a stratified random sampling procedure, half the officers (n = 252) were assigned BWCs, while officers from the control group (n =

October 31, 2019
Journal Article
 

The Treasury Department offers a plan to reduce the dominance of Fannie and Freddie and release them from conservatorship. The authors explain why the plan is based on a misconception of the source of the GSEs’ dominance and would result in less access to mortgage credit, greater risk to the taxpayer and no end in sight for the system’s reliance on a too-big-to-fail duopoly.

October 30, 2019
Brief
 

Land use regulations affect housing supply and affordability, which have implications for racial and economic segregation, urban sprawl, and neighborhood investment. But because of the decentralized nature of zoning, no central entity has records of localities’ varying local land use regulations across the country. This brief introduces the National Longitudinal Land Use Survey (NLLUS), created by the Urban Institute, to

October 29, 2019
Brief