Brett Theodos, senior fellow, testified before a subcommittee of the US House Committee on Small Business about Opportunity Zones and how the OZ incentives could be tailored to provide greater benefits to distressed communities at less cost to the federal government. His testimony noted the promising aspects of Opportunity Zones and detailed the limitations and challenges to the program as it currently exists. He also provided

October 17, 2019
Testimony
 

Report: From Incremental to Comprehensive Health Insurance Reform: How Various Reform Options Compare on Coverage and Costs Brief: Comparing Health Insurance Reform Options: From “Building on the ACA” to Single Payer Blog Post: Don’t Confuse Changes in Federal Health Spending with National Health Spending Policymakers, including candidates in the 2020 presidential campaign and members of Congress, have proposed a variety of

October 16, 2019
Research Report
 

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau is considering modifying or eliminating some of the Home Mortgage Disclosure Act data they began collecting from lenders in 2018. The researchers discuss the value of and burden of collecting data about land ownership in manufactured housing, disaggregated race/ethnicity, open format fields in loan denial and multifamily loans owned by corporate entities. They also discuss how some of the

October 15, 2019
Public Comment
 

Three work-family supports—paid leave, workplace flexibility and control, and support for child care—are crucial to the ability of parents to effectively manage work and family. This research used national survey data to examine patterns in working parents’ access to these supports; variations in access by parental characteristics like socioeconomic advantage; and the need for these work-family supports among

October 11, 2019
Research Report
 

Employers shape the work conditions that parents face, and they play a central role in policy debates about how to address work-family pressures. To better understand employer perspectives on these issues, this report presents findings from interviews with 16 organizations that represent or directly work with employers. Focusing on three policy areas central to parents’ ability to manage work and family—paid leave,

October 11, 2019
Research Report
 

The gap in the homeownership rate between black and white households is the highest it has been in 50 years. This brief examines key variables that explain the black/white homeownership gap, and estimates the role that income, education, credit score, and marital status play both nationally and locally in 105 MSAs with large black populations. The researchers determine that roughly 17 percent of the homeownership gap remains

October 10, 2019
Research Report
 

This practitioner guide synthesizes findings from a three-city evaluation of gunshot detection technology (GDT) to guide law enforcement and government officials in decisions to invest in, continue, or expand the technology in efforts to reduce violent crime. The evaluation finds that GDT is most effective when law enforcement agencies thoroughly incorporate the technology into day-to-day procedures and operations and when the

October 10, 2019
Brief
 

This report documents the decisions of six states to transition from the federally run health insurance marketplace (HealthCare.gov) to a state-run platform. Through a review of state laws and interviews with officials, insurers, consumer advocates, and consumer assisters, researchers assess states' reasons for moving to a state-run platform, risks associated with the transition, and potential long-term benefits for state health

October 10, 2019
Brief
 

.videoWrapper { position: relative; padding-bottom: 56.25%; /* 16:9 */ padding-top: 25px; height: 0; } .videoWrapper iframe { position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%; } This handbook outlines strategies to help juvenile probation practitioners align policy and practice with research to promote better outcomes for their agencies and youth. It addresses key implementation tasks that can help probation

October 9, 2019
Research Report
 

This report uses an implementation science lens to synthesize findings across published literature on a wide range of justice interventions that can inform juvenile probation management and practices, identifying successful strategies for promoting organizational change, leading a change effort, and aligning staff competencies with research-informed practice. The report also offers considerations for improving the quality of

October 9, 2019
Research Report
 

“Sin taxes” are often viewed as budget saviors, though they play a rather small role in state budgets. Although states raise revenue from sin taxes, policymakers should be mindful of these taxes’ limitations. Absent policy changes (such as increased tax rates), long-term growth for sin tax revenue has often been weak and limited. Moreover, greater dependence on sin tax revenues can lead to odd incentives: part of the reason for

October 8, 2019
Research Report
 

This paper summarizes how 15 leaders of community development finance organizations are intensifying their focus on race, gender, and equity, and it provides a prescription for change. That prescription calls for a fieldwide reformulation of the community development vision that embraces equity and justice explicitly; it calls for an expanded policy agenda to update the tools used (the Low-Income Housing Tax Credit, the New

October 7, 2019
Research Report
 

Arkansas made the news when, in June 2018, it became the first state to require work or community engagement for Medicaid enrollees. But less attention has been paid to the 2016 reinstatement of work-related “time limits” on nutrition assistance in Arkansas, though this policy change could negatively affect program participants’ lives. The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), formerly known as food

October 3, 2019
Research Report
 

In June 2018, Arkansas imposed work requirements as a condition of eligibility on beneficiaries of the state’s Medicaid expansion program, called Arkansas Works. Adults between the ages of 30 and 49 with incomes up to 138 percent of the federal poverty level had to report 80 hours a month of work or community engagement activities to the Arkansas Department of Human Services or risk losing their health coverage. For those

October 3, 2019
Research Report
 

Our report examines how employer engagement in summer youth employment programs (SYEPs) helps facilitate youths’ connections to the workforce. This is important given concerns about low levels of employment among youth and potential effects of unemployment on young people’s long-term outcomes. We focus on SYEP initiatives in three cities: New Orleans, Philadelphia, and St. Louis. We find that it is crucial for SYEP staff to

October 3, 2019
Research Report
 

Parents who have children at a young age often face an interruption in their schooling, their plans for career training, and overall life trajectory. But a growing number of young parents are seeking education and training to achieve better opportunities for their families, and many work while attending school. In this report, we use the 2012 National Survey of Early Care and Education to examine the prevalence of children born

October 3, 2019
Research Report
 

More than 40 percent of children in the United States are born to parents who had their first child when they were young (under age 25). Many of these young parents work and participate in education to advance their career prospects and improve their families’ economic security. Managing those responsibilities is challenging, and parents may need support to succeed. In this report, we analyze data on young parents (people who

October 3, 2019
Research Report
 

Approximately 43 percent of US children are born to parents who had their first child when they were younger than 25. These young parents often face greater economic challenges, because half of them live in low-income households. To advance their career prospects and improve their family’s economic security, many young parents work while also pursuing education. But balancing all those responsibilities is challenging, and

October 3, 2019
Fact Sheet
 

Long run labor market trends in the American economy pose significant challenges. Growth in real money wages has been slow, with the most rapid gains taking place among workers at the top of the earnings distribution. Labor force participation and employment rates have been falling. Reduced labor force participation and obsolescence of workers’ skills weigh down GDP growth, with predictable negative repercussions for living

October 3, 2019
Research Report
 

Administrative data—that is, the information collected by governments and organizations about the people they serve—are a rich resource for strengthening programs and services. But accessing and using such data from the different systems and agencies that house them is often difficult. Moreover, many organizations face significant learning curves when it comes to navigating privacy and data security requirements, drafting legal

October 2, 2019
Brief
 

Pay for success (PFS) shifts the risk of funding a program from traditional funders (usually a government) to investors that are repaid if the intervention achieves predetermined outcomes. PFS doesn’t work for all programs or in all contexts (Milner et al. 2016). At a minimum, practitioners need to decide whether expected outcomes can be measured and agree upon a performance threshold for repayment. Effectively addressing these

October 2, 2019
Brief
 

A collaborative planning team (CPT) is essential for managing the data-related aspects of a project, including those funded through Pay for Success (PFS) or another performance-based financing structure. A CPT is composed of stakeholders with access to administrative data from multiple service systems and could be tasked with gathering and analyzing linked data, understanding the population needs across systems or how services

October 2, 2019
Brief
 

Groups interested in launching collaborative interventions that span different service sectors need to find ways to build trust and share data and insights. Gathering and analyzing administrative data across agencies and programs can be enormously powerful. Sharing administrative data can help groups better target services, identify and eliminate inefficiencies, expand evidence-based programs, and implement performance-based

October 2, 2019
Brief
 

Permanent supportive housing helps solve our country’s homelessness crisis by improving housing stability and reducing the use of public services. The permanent supportive housing approach is backed up by promising evidence, but it can face barriers to implementation because of a lack of political will and budgetary constraints. Some local governments are exploring a financing model called pay for success (PFS), which

October 2, 2019
Brief
 

From January 2018 to March 2019, the Urban Institute evaluated the Polyvictimization Initiative at the Queens Family Justice Center (QFJC) by request of the Mayor’s Fund to Advance New York City (Mayor’s Fund). The initiative aimed to improve service delivery for polyvictim clients as part of a demonstration grant from the US Department of Justice Office for Victims of Crime (OVC), called “A Pathway to Justice, Healing and Hope

October 2, 2019
Research Report