Most Adults Who Feel Treated or Judged Unfairly When Applying for Public Benefits Report Adverse Consequences

Fact Sheet

Most Adults Who Feel Treated or Judged Unfairly When Applying for Public Benefits Report Adverse Consequences

October 21, 2021

Abstract

Nearly 7 in 10 adults who have felt treated or judged unfairly when applying for public benefits reported adverse consequences, including going without or delaying needed benefits. In the Urban Institute’s April 2021 Health Reform Monitoring Survey, more than 8 percent of adults whose families had ever received or applied for public benefits reported they had felt treated or judged unfairly because of their race or ethnicity while applying. These experiences differ starkly by race and ethnicity; Black adults and adults who are Asian, Native Hawaiian, Pacific Islander, American Indian/Alaska Native, or more than one race were at least twice as likely as white adults to report facing unfair treatment or judgment because of their race or ethnicity.

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