Research Report Evaluation of Orange County’s Proposition 47 Grant-Related Services (Cohort 2)
Subtitle
Interim Evaluation Report
Libby Doyle, Leigh Courtney, Bryce Peterson
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In November 2014, California voters approved Proposition 47, which reduced some low-level felonies in the state to misdemeanors and required the Board of State and Community Corrections (BSCC) to use a portion of the annual savings realized through Proposition 47 to administer grant programs for diversion, mental health services, or substance abuse treatment. In 2019, Orange County, California received a second cohort of funding to expand its services provided under Cohort 1, with a focus on increasing housing capacity for people with mild-to-moderate mental health and/or substance use disorders leaving the county jail. Drawing upon observations of activities and services, a review of program materials, interviews with program staff members and stakeholders, focus groups with program participants, and analyses of various program and criminal justice data, this report provides interim findings on the implementation and impact of Cohort 2 of Orange County’s Proposition 47 grant-related services. Urban researchers found that Orange County has continued the progress it made under Cohort 1 services and enhanced the services provided by the Community Support and Recovery Center (CSRC), Project Kinship, to reduce the number of people with mild-to-moderate mental health and/or substance use disorders incarcerated in the county jail by reducing recidivism through intensive case management, linkages to treatment, housing and behavioral health services, and community supports upon release.. In particular, Project Kinship has established relationships with several housing providers, and beds are now reserved and readily available for Proposition 47 clients with a multitude of needs.

Research Areas Crime, justice, and safety
Tags Corrections
Policy Centers Justice Policy Center