Carolette Norwood
Carolette Norwood

Carolette Norwood is professor and department head of sociology and criminology at Howard University. Dr. Norwood is a Black feminist sociologist whose research explores the implications of violence (structural, spatial, and interpersonal) at the intersections of race, gender, sexuality, and space on reproductive and sexual health injustice for Black women. Dr. Norwood’s research on Black women’s economic mobility and reproductive (in)justice in Cincinnati collectively informs her first book project tentatively titled, Jim Crow Geographies: Mapping the Intersections of Poverty, Gender, Race, and Sexuality in Urbane Space.

Dr. Norwood’s work also explores the simultaneity and particularities of feminism(s) in the African diaspora within and across geographical and global contexts. She earned a PhD in sociology from the University of Nebraska–Lincoln and was an Andrew W. Mellon Fellow at the Université de Montreal in African demography. She earned an MA in liberal arts with a concentration in African American studies and BA degrees in sociology and French from Louisiana State University. Dr. Norwood’s work is published in Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society, Frontiers: A Journal of Women Studies, Journal of Black Sexuality and Relationships, Journal of Black Psychology, The American Journal of Public Health, The American Journal of Health Studies, Journal of Asian and African Studies, Journal of International Women’s Studies, Development in Practice, Sociology Compass, and Societies

RESEARCH PROPOSAL SUMMARY

Studies show homeownership, health, and wellness are closely tied to economic mobility and fragility. Dr. Norwood’s proposed research aims to deepen understanding of the impact of intergenerational homeownership (and/or the loss thereof) as well as the presence of new disabilities and/or breached health on the economic mobility of Black women residing in Cincinnati. She will collect 15 to 20 in-depth interviews with adult daughters, mothers, and grandmothers to understand mobility over the life course and intergenerationally. Her broader research questions are as follows: What does economic mobility look like for Black women in Cincinnati over the life course and intergenerationally? More specifically, what are the tangible impacts of intergenerational homeownership, health status, and specifically new disabilities on Black women’s economic fragility?