Key stats, graphs, and maps on economic and social policy

Data Cards

76%: The increase in SNAP use between the beginning of the recession in 2007 and 2012

76%: The increase in SNAP use between the beginning of the recession in 2007 and 2012

46 million people received SNAP benefits in 2012, making the $72 billion program a key part of the social safety net.

Source: 2012, SNAP’s Role in the Great Recession and Beyond
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$15,900: The median wealth of young families in 2010, a third of young families’ wealth in 1983

$15,900: The median wealth of young families in 2010, a third of young families’ wealth in 1983

In regard to wealth accumulation, millennials are a “lost generation,” due to the recession, student loan debt, and other factors.

Source: 2013, Lost Generations? Wealth Building among Young Americans
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Governments paid $137 billion to nonprofit organizations for services in 2012

Governments paid $137 billion to nonprofit organizations for services in 2012

In the United States, governments partner with nonprofits to provide needed services in communities across the country.

Source: 2013, Nonprofit-Government Contracts and Grants: Findings from the 2013 National Survey
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Poor adults are almost 5x more likely to report being in fair or poor health

Low-income Americans have higher rates of heart disease, diabetes, stroke, and other chronic disorders than wealthier Americans.

Source: 2015, How Are Income and Wealth Linked to Health and Longevity?
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For twenty-something white women, 81% of the fertility decrease is due to declining marriage rates

The recession has accelerated a long-term decline in the proportion of married white, black, and Latina women in their twenties.

Source: 2015, Millennial Childbearing and the Recession
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About 30% of young people ages 16–18 who left school without a high school diploma are working

They are disproportionately male, Hispanic, and not living with a parent. Most left school before high school or in 12th grade.

Source: 2015, Dropping Out and Clocking In
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