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The inequities Black families experience in the Twin Cities illustrates the larger systemic barriers surrounding race and opportunity in the United States.
Data show that flat-out rejection of buyers seeking government-backed loans disadvantages households with lower incomes, lower credit scores, and less wealth, many of whom are people of color.
Regardless of whether COVID-19 worsened the racial and ethnic disparities in small business ownership and health, federal policymakers have options to address them.
Prioritizing philanthropy can help the Biden-Harris administration balance advancing racial equity and accomplishing aligned policy objectives.
To prevent permanent job loss and damage to a field dominated by women of color, contracts should be designed creatively and with a focus on equity.
It is cheaper to buy a home than it is to rent in two-thirds of US counties. Homeownership can provide the kind of affordability and stability low-income families need.
All kinds of gatekeepers—from journal editors and peer reviewers to government agencies and funders—can help build a system that treats researchers and participants and communities more equitably.
Data show SNAP does not cover the cost of a low-income meal in 96 percent of US counties.
Generative civil justice eliminates inequalities by creating accessible supports that give people what they need, when they need it, in a format they can use to resolve their issues.
Improving subnational resource mobilization will require building on international and local evidence and adapting to changing needs, realities, and opportunities.

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Behind the Numbers at the Urban Institute

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Structural Racism in America

Updates from the Urban Institute

Updates from the Urban Institute

Urban Wire Writers