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Between 1999 and 2015, 42 percent of white young adults owned a home, while only 18 percent of black young adults were homeowners.
Today’s young adults are less likely to own a home compared with baby boomers and Gen Xers at the same age.
Urban Institute research suggests families are jeopardizing their health and well-being to prioritize housing payments.
The cash-out refinance share of all refinances is at the highest point since the 2008 financial crisis.
Due to expire in three years, LIBOR currently sets the rate for 2.8 million adjustable-rate mortgages and most reverse mortgages.
Children younger than 4 who experience homelessness are at increased risk for adverse health outcomes.
House prices today are higher than they were in 2006, the year the housing market started to collapse.
Improving Hispanic homeownership is an investment in both the prosperity of Hispanic Americans and in the future of the nation’s economy.
Over the past four years, households have become less likely to have kids and more likely to have pets.
Fifty-four million rural residents live in areas with a severe or moderately severe need for the production of more affordable rental housing.

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