With support from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the Urban Institute set out to study how innovative policies and programs from abroad could inform state and local efforts in the United States to build an inclusive recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic. This work began with two analyses: a demand analysis to identify the priorities of top state and local policymakers for an inclusive recovery and a

October 18, 2021
Brief
 

Private insurers generally pay physicians substantially higher rates than Medicare does for the same service. Policy proposals to reduce commercial prices and curb health care spending by benchmarking private payment rates to Medicare prices could therefore significantly affect physician payments, but the effects will likely vary considerably by specialty. In this study, we assess the variation across physician

October 18, 2021
Brief
 

Despite their many economic, health, social, and environmental benefits, many parks and green spaces are underresourced or underutilized. The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the urgent need for parks and green spaces, but for many people in the US, particularly people of color and people with low incomes, quality parks and green spaces are inaccessible. Addressing these disparities and harnessing these spaces

October 18, 2021
Brief
 

In the United States, many individuals and families with low incomes struggle to find and afford rental housing because of a limited supply of options, skyrocketing costs, and stagnating wages. The COVID-19 pandemic has only exacerbated these issues, leading to job and income losses for millions of Americans. Innovative policy solutions, including ones inspired from abroad, can improve housing stability for

October 18, 2021
Brief
 

Despite the COVID-19 pandemic, equity financing in the US is at an all-time high. But this form of capital in the US is highly concentrated by geography, industry, race, and gender. Equity investors are increasingly financing larger, more mature businesses rather than smaller startups in need of capital, and most equity financing is concentrated on the coasts and in the male-dominated fields of technology and

October 18, 2021
Brief
 

For decades, policy experts, practitioners, and advocates have called attention to the inadequate public funding that supports the child care sector in the US. As a result, many child care providers in underresourced communities struggle to survive without additional support, and access to child care depends heavily on parents’ ability to pay the high costs. The COVID-19 pandemic exacerbated this crisis, and

October 18, 2021
Brief
 

High-speed broadband has become the connective tissue between the individual and all facets of society: educational, professional, social, and civic. The COVID-19 pandemic has only cemented this reality as schools, businesses, and governments have shifted online. Yet millions of Americans lack affordable access to baseline broadband. Bridging this connectivity gap is essential to an inclusive and equitable

October 18, 2021
Brief
 

This report shares Year 2 (2020) findings from an ongoing evaluation of the Meals-to-You (MTY) program, a pilot program administered by the Baylor Collaborative on Hunger and Poverty (BCHP) and funded by the US Department of Agriculture (USDA). The original aim of the MTY pilot was to provide a stable and reliable source of food through home delivery to children in rural areas who lack access to Summer Food

October 15, 2021
Research Report
 

Many families with children faced precarious health care access and affordability as the COVID-19 pandemic and resulting recession took hold in 2020, and numerous families experienced additional economic and health challenges in the ensuing months. The American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA) included temporary changes to the premium subsidy schedule in the Affordable Care Act (ACA) Marketplaces aimed at improving the

October 12, 2021
Research Report
 

In this fact sheet, we use 2018–19 American Community Survey data to examine uninsurance rates among non-Hispanic parents who are Asian American/Pacific Islander (AAPI) by national origin. An estimated 5.8 percent of AAPI parents (294,000 parents) were uninsured in 2018–19, compared with 11.5 percent of parents overall. But AAPI parents’ uninsurance varied dramatically by national origin, with Korean parents

October 12, 2021
Fact Sheet
 

In this fact sheet, we use 2018–19 American Community Survey data to examine uninsurance rates among non-Hispanic children who are Asian American/Pacific Islander (AAPI) by national origin. AAPI children’s 3.5 percent uninsurance rate in 2018–19 was lower than that for children overall, but it conceals variation by national origin. For instance, Korean and Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander children’s uninsurance

October 12, 2021
Fact Sheet
 

Rural areas are places of underappreciated diversity, cultural vitality, and economic innovation and resiliency. But persistent poverty is holding back about one in seven rural counties. With a goal to transform the fortunes and futures of rural and Native communities, the Partners for Rural Transformation (PRT) centers community needs and hopes in its work. Covering broad and diverse areas—including parts of

October 12, 2021
Research Report
 

Warren County, Ohio’s Child Assessment and Response Evaluation (CARE) project – a 24/7 rapid-response intervention for children at the scene of an overdose of a parent or loved one – identified and assisted 40 families affected by substance use disorders, assessed children for exposure to trauma, and successfully connected them to substance use services in the community. Further, CARE improved perceptions of

October 12, 2021
Research Report
 

Nurse practitioners (NPs) are an increasingly integral part of the primary care workforce. NPs' authority to practice without physician oversight is regulated by state-level scope of practice (SOP) restrictions. To the extent that SOP restrictions prevent NPs from practicing to their full abilities and capacity, they could create inefficiencies and restrict access to health care. In this paper, I study what

October 8, 2021
Journal Article
 

Nonprofit organizations in the United States play a vital role delivering services, strengthening communities, and facilitating civic engagement. In our nationally representative survey of nonprofit organizations fielded January through April of 2021, we focus on operating 501(c)(3) public charities whose activities range from direct service provision to community building and advocacy. We provide new evidence

October 7, 2021
Research Report
 

In 2021, the American Rescue Plan Act temporarily expanded the federal child tax credit (CTC) for one year, including some families formerly ineligible for the credit. This could lift 59,000 children in Oklahoma out of poverty annually, cutting the state's 13 percent child poverty rate roughly in half (Acs and Werner 2021). The IRS sent payments automatically to people who had filed tax returns in either 2019 or

October 6, 2021
Fact Sheet
 

In the face of increased national attention to long-existent and worsening racialized gaps in health, wealth, and well-being, some philanthropic organizations are reexamining what and how they fund to create initiatives that advance equity through durable shifts in policy and practice. Funders and their grantees need to collaborate within a framework of mutual accountability that has explicit commitments:

October 5, 2021
Brief
 

This study uses the Urban Institute’s Dynamic Simulation of Income Model to project the share of Social Security beneficiaries whose retirement incomes fall below 75 percent of preretirement income, a common benchmark for a secure retirement. Absent significant Social Security reforms, we project the share of beneficiaries with inadequate retirement income will rise from 26 to 45 percent between 2020 and 2090.

October 4, 2021
Research Report
 

A public option and a strategy of capping payments made to health care providers by commercial insurers are two health reform approaches that are related; both seek to provide insurance options to consumers that would pay providers based upon payments determined (in the case of the public option) or limited (in the case of capped provider prices) by the federal government or its chosen agent. The public option

September 30, 2021
Brief
 

This technical white paper provides an overview of the privacy-preserving validation server prototype from project, researcher, and technical perspectives. In the first section, we discuss the purpose of the project, our process for building the prototype, key concepts, and how we envision a researcher might use the tool. In the second section, we provide detail on how this system could be adopted by other

September 30, 2021
Technical Paper
 

The expansion to the child tax credit (CTC) enacted through the American Rescue Plan Act could significantly change the landscape of child poverty. As policymakers and other stakeholders debate the future of the expanded CTC, the voices and perspectives of families with children should be front and center in the public dialogue. To learn more about families receiving the CTC and the early impact of the advance

September 29, 2021
Brief
 

The September edition of At a Glance, the Housing Finance Policy Center’s reference guide for mortgage and housing market data, includes updated figures describing household equity levels,  refinance shares, and second home purchase activity.

September 28, 2021
Research Report
 

In this fact sheet, we use data from the Urban Institute’s Health Reform Monitoring Survey to assess knowledge gaps about Marketplace coverage among nonelderly uninsured adults in April 2021, finding that fewer than half reported having heard a lot or some about the Marketplaces and fewer than a third reported having heard a lot or some about subsidies that make Marketplace coverage and care more affordable.

September 28, 2021
Fact Sheet
 

Only 24 percent of households living in Newark, New Jersey, own their home. While efforts to boost homeownership within the city are critical, ensuring that current owners do not lose their homes is also important. However, foreclosure risk may be heightened in Newark due to the interaction of racial inequities with the COVID-19 recession. To test this hypothesis, we constructed a standard regression model to

September 28, 2021
Research Report
 

This chartbook provides a comprehensive overview of racial disparities in homeownership in the Detroit MSA by analyzing household socioeconomic characteristics, mortgage and credit, home prices, and housing supply in Detroit that are all related to the lower Black homeownership rate and housing wealth in the region. It aims to help local decisionmakers identify and evaluate solutions to racial housing wealth

September 28, 2021
Research Report