PROJECTThe Registered Apprenticeship Occupations and Standards Center of Excellence

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  • Advanced Manufacturing
    Combination Welder

    Occupational Purpose and Context

    Welding is the chemical process of melting and heating sculptures and forming a new shape or figure by fusing the melted parts together. A combination welder uses specialized welding equipment to construct, maintain, and repair metal parts, such as pipes. Welding requires extremely high temperatures that melt the base materials. Welders often work on a construction or job site where they weld rebar, beams, or other metal structural components. The job duties of a combination welder also include preparing materials, reading technical schematics, making precise measurements, and welding components in a variety of space constraints.

    Welding applies to various materials, including metal, wood, and plastic. Several types of welding are available, with various uses for them. One specialty and niche in welding is combination welding, which is the process of preparing materials to be welded, welding metal parts, and performing maintenance work on welding torches and other equipment.

    A combination welder is responsible for making, repairing, and maintaining metal parts using specialized equipment. Combination welders are often preferred on construction sites, where they assist with the welding of the beams and other structural components.

    National Occupational Framework (pdf)

    Occupational Health and Safety Technician

    Occupational Purpose and Context

    Occupational Health and Safety Technicians support the work of other safety officials in a workplace or are contracted to support workplace safety by employers. They collect work environment safety data for analysis, prepare safety reports, and provide workplace safety trainings and recommendations. Occupational health and safety technicians (OHSTs) also help implement and evaluate safety and health programs to limit hazards and injuries for workers or reduce their exposure to chemicals or pollutants.

    OHSTs work in a variety of settings, such as offices, construction sites, manufacturing facilities, hospitals, colleges and universities, and other workplaces. The range of activities for this profession depends on the type of setting in which the technicians perform their duties. The occupation includes significant fieldwork where they may assist in examining workplace mishaps. This role may also require significant travel, depending on the employer. These technicians may use a variety of tools or instruments to collect data and will wear and demonstrate the proper use of safety equipment, such as gloves, helmets, respirators, and other personal protective and equipment (PPE) to minimize the risk of illness and injury.

    National Occupational Framework (pdf)