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A new report found that 8.3 million low-income households paid more than half their monthly income on rent or lived in severely substandard housing in 2015.
In a $4.3 billion deal announced last week, two of the country’s largest landlords of single-family rentals agreed to merge.
The new Duty to Serve rule seeks to improve how Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac support low-income households.
The rental housing landscape is rapidly changing. Meanwhile, the pace of constructing new rental housing supply can't meet growing demand.
The number of first-time homebuyers remains strong, while the number of repeat homebuyers lags well below its historical average.
For decades, Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac have issued separate mortgage-backed securities. But the price difference between the two has cost taxpayers billions.
The median FICO score for borrowers approved for agency-originated loans has declined from 742 in June 2016 to 725 in April 2017.
Community banks don’t have the resources of larger, national banks, so navigating the myriad of available mortgage lending programs can be a daunting task.
A close look at the data makes it clear that homeownership doesn’t protect low-income homeowners from the same cost burdens as low-income renters.
History shows that reducing spending only increases homelessness and drives costs up.

The Future of Federal Antipoverty Programs

COLLECTION

The Future of Federal Antipoverty Programs

How will transformative policy changes affect millions of American families?

Structural Racism in America

COLLECTION

Structural Racism in America

Public policies, institutional practices, and cultural narratives perpetuate our country's racial inequalities. 

How Can We Reduce Poverty and Increase Opportunity?

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How Can We Reduce Poverty and Increase Opportunity?

More than 48 million Americans, including one in six children, live in poverty. How can we do better?

Urban Wire Writers