The voices of Urban Institute's researchers and staff
May 5, 2011

Neighborhood Diversity: Immigration Changes Urban Neighborhoods

Over the last three decades, US metro areas have become dramatically more diverse, and neighborhood segregation has slowly declined. In 1980, in only 7 big metros was the average white person's neighborhood more than a quarter minority.  These mixed-race metros were mostly on the west coast and near the Mexican border.  Today, 41 of the top 100 metros -- some in the south and midwest --have neighborhoods this diverse, with at least 25 percent people of color living in the average white's neighborhood.

Neighborhood-diversity

 

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