Nonstandard Work Schedules and the Well-being of Low-Income Families

Brief

Nonstandard Work Schedules and the Well-being of Low-Income Families

July 31, 2013

Abstract

In 201011, 28 percent of lower-income workers, and 20 percent of all workers, worked most of their hours between 6 p.m. and 6 a.m. or on weekends. The occupations and industries with the most nonstandard-schedule workers are among the lowest paid and among those with the most expected employment growth by 2020. These workers have to arrange child care when most centers are closed, commute when public transportation is less available, and carve out time with family, while often working irregular schedules with no paid time off. Work support strategies, workplace development, and schools can help work-family balance.

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