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Race, Ethnicity, Gender

 
Multi EthnicUrban Institute researchers examine gender inequalities, racial segregation, and the mutually reinforcing disparities they cause in education, housing, employment, income, and health care.

Our experts analyze race and gender gaps in student test scores, measure unequal treatment toward minorities in the housing market, and study the persistent discrimination that feeds wealth and income gaps. We also probe the unique challenges of single mothers, noncustodial fathers, and hard-to-employ young men—and evaluate the public and private programs designed to help them.

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Evaluation of the Alaska Native Science and Engineering Program (ANSEP) (Research Report)
Hamutal Bernstein, Carlos Martin, Lauren Eyster, Theresa Anderson, Stephanie Owen, Ananda Martin-Caughey

The Urban Institute conducted an implementation and participant-outcomes evaluation of the Alaska Native Science & Engineering Program (ANSEP). ANSEP is a multi-stage initiative designed to prepare and support Alaska Native students from middle school through graduate school to succeed in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) careers. The findings inform ANSEP’s programming and provide lessons for other STEM education programs that serve underrepresented minorities nationwide.

Posted to Web: January 26, 2015Publication Date: January 26, 2015

Building Alaska's Science and Engineering Pipeline: Evaluation of the Alaska Native Science & Engineering Program (Research Report)
Hamutal Bernstein, Carlos Martin, Lauren Eyster, Theresa Anderson, Stephanie Owen, Ananda Martin-Caughey

The Urban Institute conducted an implementation and participant-outcomes evaluation of the Alaska Native Science & Engineering Program (ANSEP). ANSEP is a multi-stage initiative designed to prepare and support Alaska Native students from middle school through graduate school to succeed in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) careers. The Brief summarizes the findings of the full-length Report, providing an overview of the major takeaways from the evaluation project. The findings inform ANSEP’s programming and provide lessons for other STEM education programs that serve underrepresented minorities nationwide.

Posted to Web: January 20, 2015Publication Date: January 20, 2015

Evolving Patterns in Diversity: Mapping America's Futures, Brief 2 (Research Report)
Steven Martin, Nan Astone, H. Elizabeth Peters, Rolf Pendall, Austin Nichols, Kaitlin Franks, Allison Stolte

From 2010 to 2030 the United States will become more racially and ethnically diverse, but demographic projections suggest the patterns of increasing diversity will vary widely across cities and regions. We project changes in the population shares across geographies for four major groups: Hispanics, non-Hispanic blacks, non-Hispanic whites, and non-Hispanic others. Though growing diversity across the United States will be welcome in many ways, it will also bring challenges to areas in which different groups increase in population share.

Posted to Web: January 20, 2015Publication Date: January 20, 2015

Methodology and Assumptions for the Mapping America's Futures Project: Mapping America's Futures, Brief 5 (Research Report)
Austin Nichols, Steven Martin, Kaitlin Franks

The Mapping America's Futures project has developed multiple series of population projections for 740 commuting zones in the United States by age, race, and ethnicity. This brief explains the assumptions and methodology of our population projections.

Posted to Web: January 20, 2015Publication Date: January 20, 2015

2000-2010 Population Profiles: Atlanta, Las Vegas, Washington, DC, and Youngstown: Mapping America's Futures, Brief 6 (Research Report)
Allison Stolte, Kaitlin Franks, Nan Astone, Steven Martin, Rolf Pendall, H. Elizabeth Peters, Austin Nichols

The Mapping America’s Futures project has developed multiple series of population projections by age, race, and ethnicity for the 740 commuting zones in the United States. This brief examines the diverse population structures and growth patterns across four commuting zones in 2010 to illustrate the variances in populations across the United States that influence the 2030 projections.

Posted to Web: January 20, 2015Publication Date: January 20, 2015

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