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Interactive Map Shows Local Job Strength by Sector

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Document date: January 26, 2012
Released online: January 26, 2012

Abstract

The Urban Institute's MetroTrends research team has created an interactive map that reveals the relative employment strength in 16 job sectors for the nation’s top 100 metropolitan areas. A brief commentary by Graham MacDonald accompanies the map.


Contact: Stu Kantor, (202) 261-5283, skantor@urban.org

WASHINGTON, D.C., January 26, 2012 -- The Urban Institute’s MetroTrends research team has created an interactive map that reveals the relative employment strength in 16 job sectors for the nation’s top 100 metropolitan areas. A brief commentary by Graham MacDonald accompanies the map.

The metros ranking first and last based on the percentage change in jobs from the end of the recession (June 2009) through October 2011:

Education and Health Services


Financial Activities


Goods Producing


Government


Information


Leisure and Hospitality


Manufacturing


Other Services


Private Service Providing


Professional and Business Services


Retail Trade


Service Providing


Total Private


Trade, Transportation, and Utilities


Transportation and Utilities


Wholesale Trade

#1: Phoenix–Mesa–Scottsdale, AZ (15.1%)
#100: Greensboro–High Point, NC (-3.2%)

#1: Dallas–Fort Worth–Arlington, TX (4.4%)
#100: Las Vegas–Paradise, NV (-17.2%)

#1: Lansing–East Lansing, MI (17.1%)
#100: Las Vegas–Paradise, NV (-29.1%)

#1: Nashville–Davidson–Murfreesboro–Franklin, TN (14.0%)
#100: Stockton, CA (-8.4%)

#1: New Orleans–Metairie–Kenner, LA (23.9%)
#100: New Haven, CT (-27.3%)

#1: Worcester, MA–CT (8.7%)
#100: Lansing–East Lansing, MI (-15.0%)

#1: Lansing–East Lansing, MI (23.3%)
#100: Little Rock–North Little Rock–Conway, AR (-11.8%)

#1: Milwaukee–Waukesha–West Allis, WI (12.7%)
#100: Modesto, CA (-11.3%)

#1: Greenville–Mauldin–Easley, SC (6.3%)
#100: Palm Bay–Melbourne–Titusville, FL (-3.9%)

#1: Greenville–Mauldin–Easley, SC (22.7%)
#100: Palm Bay–Melbourne–Titusville, FL (-17.4%)

#1: El Paso, TX (7.3%)
#100: Albany–Schenectady–Troy, NY (-7.0%)

#1: McAllen–Edinburg–Mission, TX (5.8%)
#100: Sacramento–Arden–Arcade–Roseville, CA (-3.2%)

#1: Grand Rapids–Wyoming, MI (4.7%)
#100: Palm Bay–Melbourne–Titusville, FL (-5.3%)

#1: El Paso, TX (5.9%)
#100: Albany–Schenectady–Troy, NY (-5.3%)

#1: Lansing–East Lansing, MI (21.7%)
#100: Little Rock–North Little Rock–Conway, AR (-9.5%)

#1: Austin–Round Rock, TX (10.0%)
#100: Las Vegas–Paradise, NV (-11.8%)

The map uses Current Employment Statistics data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics and will be updated monthly. It allows users to

  1. see national trends in the number of industry jobs,
  2. observe job changes in metros, by industry,
  3. assess an industry’s share of jobs in each metro,
  4. determine each metro’s rank by an industry’s share of local jobs,
  5. compare an industry’s share of total jobs for multiple metros or compare different industries in one metro, and
  6. download data for each metro area.

MetroTrends, the Urban Institute’s report card and toolkit on the state of metropolitan economies, features up-to-date charts and figures, expert commentaries, and downloadable datasets. The MetroTrends blog presents seasoned voices on the changes and challenges facing metropolitan America.

The Urban Institute (www.urban.org) is a nonprofit, nonpartisan policy research and educational organization that examines the social, economic, and governance challenges facing the nation. It provides information, analyses, and perspectives to public and private decisionmakers to help them address these problems and strives to deepen citizens’ understanding of the issues and tradeoffs that policymakers face.



Topics/Tags: | Cities and Neighborhoods | Employment


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