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Open and Operating? An Assessment of Louisiana Nonprofit Health and Human Services after Hurricanes Katrina and Rita

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Document date: February 02, 2006
Released online: February 02, 2006

The nonpartisan Urban Institute publishes studies, reports, and books on timely topics worthy of public consideration. The views expressed are those of the authors and should not be attributed to the Urban Institute, its trustees, or its funders.

Note: This report is available in its entirety in the Portable Document Format (PDF).

The text below is a portion of the complete document.


The devastating hurricanes of 2005 demonstrated how essential nonprofit organizations are to communities. Nonprofits provided food, shelter, and vital information services in the weeks and months after the storms while struggling to repair their own hurricane damage. Now, Louisiana's nonprofits—experts in community-based service delivery—are poised to play pivotal roles in the state's recovery. But how prepared are they to meet the immense challenges ahead? To find out, the Urban Institute, in partnership with the Louisiana Association of Nonprofit Organizations (LANO), surveyed Louisiana's charitable organizations.

All 3,200 of the state's nonprofits contribute to the social and economic life of Louisianans.1 The $8 billion they collectively spend each year pays for the cultural backbone of the state, extra support for the public education system, emergency food supplies and clothing, advocacy on behalf of vulnerable populations, and more. Our survey, however, homed in on health and human services in the 37 parishes most affected by Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. Particularly important to recovery efforts, these organizations construct and manage affordable housing, offer job training, provide reliable emergency services, and administer quality health care.

The survey results bring much-needed data to help us understand the state of the nonprofit sector in southern Louisiana, and begin to tell some of their stories.

Notes from this section of the report

1. Data on the number and expenditures of nonprofits in Louisiana reflect fiscal year 2003 and come from the NCCS-GuideStar National Nonprofit Research Database.

Note: This report is available in its entirety in the Portable Document Format (PDF).



Topics/Tags: | Cities and Neighborhoods | Nonprofits


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