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The Challenges of Prisoner Reentry: Facts and Figures

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Document date: May 01, 2008
Released online: May 28, 2008

The nonpartisan Urban Institute publishes studies, reports, and books on timely topics worthy of public consideration. The views expressed are those of the authors and should not be attributed to the Urban Institute, its trustees, or its funders.

The text below is an excerpt from the complete document. Read the full fact sheet in PDF format.


Abstract

This fact sheet points out the main challenges former jail and prison inmates have in returning to society. The consequences of their employment problems and recidivism are experienced not just by the former inmates but also by their families, which are predominantly low-income and include over 3 million children.


Introduction

Every year, millions of men and women leave America’s state and federal prisons and local jails with the hope of a successful return to society. In 2005, 698,459 individuals passed through prison gates and an estimated 9 million individuals exited jail.

Many former prisoners return to dependent children.In 2001, prisoners released from state or federal prison were parents to 1.5 million children. There are 3.2 million children if inmates released from jail and on parole are included.

The challenges of prisoner reentry are therefore not experienced by released prisoners alone; they are challenges experienced by families that are predominantly low income.

(End of excerpt. The entire fact sheet is available in PDF format.)



Topics/Tags: | Children and Youth | Families and Parenting | Poverty, Assets and Safety Net


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