urban institute nonprofit social and economic policy research

Head Start and the Changing Demographics of Today's Young Children

Read complete document: PDF


PrintPrint this page
Share:
Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on LinkedIn Share on Digg Share on Reddit
| Email this pageE-mail
Document date: July 01, 2011
Released online: July 19, 2011

Abstract

The increasing diversity of America's young children has important implications for Head Start and Early Head Start programs.  This paper summarizes recent changes in the racial and ethnic composition of young children, particularly increases in Hispanic and Asian children, as well as shifts in where young children live, with some northeastern and Midwestern states losing children while southern and southwestern states are rapidly gaining.  Based on these trends and recent Urban Institute research, the paper makes four recommendations about how local Head Start practitioners can best meet the needs of today's young children and their families.

The text below is an excerpt from the complete document. Read the entire briefing in PDF format.

More from NHSA Dialog: a Research-to-Practice Journal, here.


Introduction

Today, the portrait of our nation's children is changing rapidly. Results recently released from the 2010 Census show a dramatic change in the racial and ethnic composition of children, particularly increases in Hispanic and Asian children and declines in white children (and a slight decline nationally in the number of black children) (Frey, 2011). Other recent national surveys show a sharp increase in the proportion of children, and young children in particular, whose parents are immigrants.Where young children live has also changed, with some northeastern and Midwestern states losing children while southern and southwestern states are rapidly gaining (Fortuny, Hernandez,& Chaudry, 2010; Frey, 2011). Head Start and Early Head Start programs have always understood that high-quality services are grounded in a thorough understanding of the children and families in their communities. This article briefly summarizes the major changes in the population of young children and makes four recommendations for local programs.

End of excerpt. The entire briefing is available in PDF format.



Topics/Tags: | Children and Youth | Families and Parenting | Immigrants | Nonprofits | Race/Ethnicity/Gender


Usage and reprints: Most publications may be downloaded free of charge from the web site and may be used and copies made for research, academic, policy or other non-commercial purposes. Proper attribution is required. Posting UI research papers on other websites is permitted subject to prior approval from the Urban Institute—contact publicaffairs@urban.org.

If you are unable to access or print the PDF document please contact us or call the Publications Office at (202) 261-5687.

Disclaimer: The nonpartisan Urban Institute publishes studies, reports, and books on timely topics worthy of public consideration. The views expressed are those of the authors and should not be attributed to the Urban Institute, its trustees, or its funders. Copyright of the written materials contained within the Urban Institute website is owned or controlled by the Urban Institute.

Email this Page