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Hilton Foundation Project to End Homelessness for People with Mental Illness in Los Angeles

Changes in Homelessness, Supportive Housing, and Tenant Characteristics Since 2005

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Document date: April 01, 2008
Released online: April 28, 2008

The nonpartisan Urban Institute publishes studies, reports, and books on timely topics worthy of public consideration. The views expressed are those of the authors and should not be attributed to the Urban Institute, its trustees, or its funders.

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Abstract

In 2005, the Hilton Foundation gave CSH a five-year grant to launch an initiative in Los Angeles County to reduce the number of long-term homeless people, with a special focus on people with serious mental illness. The Urban Institute, which is evaluating the grant's impact, did a baseline assessment of homelessness and permanent supportive housing in 2005. A 2007 report assessed the policy and system changes that, working with others, CSH efforts had stimulated by that time. This report documents two-year changes in the level of homelessness in Los Angeles and the availability and characteristics of PSH availability. A second policy report will be available in fall 2008.


Introduction

In 2005, the Hilton Foundation gave CSH a five-year grant to launch an initiative in Los Angeles County to reduce the number of long-term homeless people, with a special focus on reducing homelessness among people with serious mental illness. To promote these outcomes, CSH has been using grant money to: fund predevelopment work on various permanent supportive housing (PSH) projects, invest in building the capacity of supportive housing providers, work with public officials and other key stakeholders in the county and selected cities (Los Angeles, Long Beach, Santa Monica, and others) to stimulate increased commitment to PSH, support the Special Needs Housing Alliance, and pursue other activities with City and County of Los Angeles officials and agencies.

CSH contracted with the Urban Institute to help evaluate this initiative. A first evaluation report (Burt 2005a) served two purposes - it presented an evaluation plan to address the research questions posed by the Foundation, and documented baseline levels of the target population and activities in Los Angeles County focused on ending long-term homelessness. The second evaluation report examined the extent of systems change in the first two years of grant funding and the extent to which it could be attributed to CSH activities under the grant or connected to it (Burt 2007a). This third report is an update of the first one, focusing on changes in baseline levels of the target population and PSH availability in Los Angeles County. A fourth report, expected in late summer 2008, will update the policy impact/systems change information with activities and their effects in 2007.

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Topics/Tags: | Cities and Neighborhoods | Health/Healthcare


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