Introducing the Evidence-Based Policymaking Collaborative

The Evidence-Based Policymaking Collaborative develops tools to inform evidence-based policymaking at all levels of government.

Managing investor risk in pay for success

All investments carry risk. Pay for success projects are no exception.

Place, race, and economic mobility

Evidence suggests that there is a connection between children’s economic future and factors that have nothing to do with individual effort, such as their parents’ income, race, and the neighborhood in which they live.

The strongest way to measure the success of a PFS project

Measuring the impact of spending on social programs is critical to making sure we get the most bang for our scarce government bucks.

Can Orange is the New Black pay for success?

Recidivism is a measurable outcome and metrics like costs per occupied bed in a facility like Litchfield show a clear financial benefit associated with fewer people reoffending.

How much is school readiness worth to local governments?

Can the benefits of entering kindergarten with a strong foundation be quantified? What’s a reasonable amount to pay for preschool programs that successfully improve children’s outcomes?

Why are debt collections so prevalent in black and Latino neighborhoods?

The link between race and debt sustains even after accounting for area income, unemployment, levels of education, and home values, all of which explain why some places seem to struggle more with paying bills than others.

Two American experiences: The racial divide of poverty

A black child who grew up in poverty in the late 1960s was twice as likely as a white child who grew up in poverty to also be poor as an adult.

Using pay for success to fund early childhood education

Early childhood education is critical for healthy growth and development, but many children don't receive the programs they need. Pay for success can help scale programs that work.

Seeing the humanity in others

Often, the response to police killing African Americans has been to provide more training to police forces. But we need a deeper change to transcend bias and disrupt this pattern of killings.