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Nonprofits

Building House

The nonprofit sector has been growing steadily, both in size and financial impact, for more than a decade. Between 2001 and 2011, the number of nonprofits has increased 25 percent; from 1,259,764 million to 1,574,674 million today. The growth rate of the nonprofit sector has surpassed the rate of both the business and government sectors.

In 2010, nonprofits contributed products and services that added $779 billion to the nation’s gross domestic product; 5.4 percent of GDP. Nonprofits are also a major employer, accounting for 9 percent of the economy’s wages, and over 10 percent of jobs in 2009. Read more.

Center on Nonprofits and Philanthropy

The UI Center on Nonprofits and Philanthropy celebrated 15 years with a series of 15th Anniversary events to bring into focus the big issues facing society and the nonprofit sector. More

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Contracts and Grants between Human Service Nonprofits and Government: Comparative Analysis (Research Report)
Sarah L. Pettijohn, Elizabeth T. Boris

Government's reliance on human service nonprofits to provide services has been increasing, expanding the ability of nonprofits to achieve their missions and the ability of government to serve its constituents. This brief summarizes results from human service nonprofits in the second national study of government contracts and grants. We compare results of human service organizations in the 2013 national survey of nonprofits to the results of the survey conducted in 2010. We examine how human service organizations have managed since the recession ended and how their relationships with governments have changed.

Posted to Web: July 24, 2014Publication Date: July 24, 2014

Case Study: NNIP and Open Data in Detroit (Research Brief)
Eric Burnstein

Adopting open data principles is difficult in cities undergoing economic hardship, but the benefits of doing so are great. In Detroit, Data Driven Detroit (D3), a local National Neighborhood Indicators partner, has worked to provide local data to the community free of charge. Though they have encountered institutional and cultural barriers, D3 has advanced their cause through partnership with local organizations and government. With new funding opportunities and new movement on open data by the city, D3 is making data meaningful and accessible, as well as advocating for open data and data-driven decisionmaking by community organizations and government.

Posted to Web: July 22, 2014Publication Date: July 22, 2014

The Effect of Government Contracting on Nonprofit Human Service Organizations: Impacts of an Evolving Relationship (Research Report)
Brett Never, Erwin de Leon

Governments contract with human service nonprofits to provide services in complex environments (Frahm & Martin, 2009). This article builds on the robust literature of public contracting for human services, but considers the effect of contracting on the contractor rather than the government. Using the National Survey of Nonprofit Government Contracting and Grants, conducted during the financial recession, we consider how contracting practices are harming trust. We find that human service nonprofits are more likely to cut salaries and jobs due to having government contracts, leading one to question whether the partnership mode of contracting will remain effective.

Posted to Web: July 15, 2014Publication Date: July 15, 2014

The Impact of the Great Recession on the Number of Charities by Subsector and Revenue Range (Research Report)
Nathan Dietz, Brice McKeever, Melissa S. Brown, Jeremy Koulish, Thomas H. Pollak

Posted to Web: June 24, 2014Publication Date: June 24, 2014

The Tax Exemption Under Section 501(c)(4) (Research Report)
Dan Halperin

This brief discusses the justification for income tax exemption for organizations qualifying under section 501(c)(4). It explores why these organizations are deemed unworthy of the charitable contribution deduction but nevertheless entitled to be exempt on their entire income. It notes that income tax exemption generally only benefits entities that accumulate funds, suggesting accumulation is desirable. It further points out that the subsidy from income tax exemption for long-term accumulation can exceed the benefit of the charitable deduction. The brief concludes that income tax exemption under section 501(c)(4) cannot be justified either on the grounds that it is relatively unimportant or by analogy to the treatment of mutual organizations, whose exemption has been circumscribed.

Posted to Web: June 11, 2014Publication Date: May 01, 2014

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