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Homelessness

 
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Homeless LGBTQ Youth (Research Brief)
Mary K. Cunningham, Mike Pergamit, Nan Astone, Jessica Luna

Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, or Questioning (LGBTQ) youth are over-represented among the homeless youth population. Researchers and practitioners are working to improve data on homeless youth, especially LGBTQ youth, across the country. This brief summarizes the findings on LGBTQ homeless youth counted during the 2013 YouthCount!, a federal interagency initiative that aims to improve counts of unaccompanied homeless youth. The brief also shares best practices on how to improve counts of LGBTQ homeless youth, and areas where policymakers can act to improve LGBTQ youth outcomes.

Posted to Web: August 21, 2014Publication Date: August 21, 2014

Housing Security in the Washington Region (Research Report)
Leah Hendey, Peter A. Tatian, Graham MacDonald

This study examines critical gaps in affordable housing across a range of income levels in the Washington, DC region. More permanent supportive housing is needed to reduce chronic homelessness. The lack of affordable apartments, particularly for extremely low income renters, contributed to the number of homeless people and resulted in over half of all renters paying over 30 percent of their income on housing costs. Low income homebuyers also faced challenges because of high prices. These findings can help local governments and philanthropy direct scarce public and private resources to address the region's affordable housing needs.

Posted to Web: July 15, 2014Publication Date: July 15, 2014

Innovations in NYC Health and Human Services Policy: Street Homelessness and Supportive Housing (Research Brief)
Josh Leopold

Under the Bloomberg administration, New York City built a system for moving chronically homeless individuals off the streets and into permanent housing by restructuring the contracts for homeless street outreach, developing alternatives to shelter for the chronically homeless, and, in partnership with New York State, creating thousands of supportive housing units for people experiencing or at risk of homelessness. Additional progress relies on continued focus on permanent housing placements among street outreach providers and increased investment in supportive housing. This brief is one in a series examining selected social service initiatives undertaken during the Bloomberg administration.

Posted to Web: March 17, 2014Publication Date: March 17, 2014

Innovations in NYC Health and Human Services Policy: Homelessness Prevention, Intake, and Shelter for Single Adults and Families (Research Brief)
Christin Durham, Martha C. Johnson

The Bloomberg administration's efforts to improve New York City's homeless services included creating a new homelessness prevention model, overhauling the shelter intake and eligibility process for families, and developing a temporary rental assistance program. While the administration made substantial progress in addressing homelessness, some shelter policies were criticized by homeless advocates and received negative media attention. Today, despite successes with homelessness prevention and rehousing, the city's shelter population is the largest it has ever been, and the shortage of affordable housing is worsening. This brief is one in a series examining selected social service initiatives undertaken during the Bloomberg administration.

Posted to Web: March 17, 2014Publication Date: March 17, 2014

Examining Housing as a Pathway to Successful Reentry: A Demonstration Design Process (Research Report)
Jocelyn Fontaine

This paper describes a reentry housing demonstration design process that will fill the gaps in the literature and strengthen policy and practice. The demonstration would include a range of housing and supportive services for formerly incarcerated persons, primarily focused on making meaningful reductions in returns to incarceration. The associated study would explore whether housing leads to reductions in recidivism and increases in the reintegration of those released from incarceration. Examples of potential partnerships and opportunities for reentry housing programming and funding are discussed. The paper concludes with several key hallmarks for the proposed demonstration to achieve its intended goals.

Posted to Web: November 15, 2013Publication Date: November 13, 2013

Youth Count! Process Study (Research Report)
Mike Pergamit, Mary K. Cunningham, Martha R. Burt, Pamela Lee, Brent Howell, Kassie Dumlao Bertumen

Homelessness among unaccompanied youth is a hidden problem: the number of young people who experience homelessness each year is largely unknown. To improve the national response to youth homelessness, policymakers need better data on the magnitude of the problem. Youth Count! is a Federal interagency initiative that aims to improve counts of unaccompanied homeless youth. Nine communities participated in the initiative by expanding their annual homeless point-in-time efforts to increase coverage of homeless youth. Urban Institute conducted a process study of the initiative to identify promising practices that could be adapted and taken to scale to produce credible and useful data nationwide.

Posted to Web: July 30, 2013Publication Date: July 30, 2013

Counting Homeless Youth: Promising Practices from the Youth Count! Initiative (Research Report)
Mike Pergamit, Mary K. Cunningham, Martha R. Burt, Pamela Lee, Brent Howell, Kassie Dumlao Bertumen

Knowing how many youth are homeless is a critical first step in helping them, but it's not easy to count a hidden population. Nine communities across the United States set out to improve their counts through the Youth Count! Initiative. The Urban Institute observed their work and drew out promising practices and lessons for improvement.

Posted to Web: July 30, 2013Publication Date: July 30, 2013

Supportive Housing for Returning Prisoners: Outcomes and Impacts of the Returning Home-Ohio Pilot Project (Research Report)
Jocelyn Fontaine, Douglas Gilchrist-Scott, John Roman, Samuel Taxy, Caterina Gouvis Roman

This evaluation of a supportive housing reentry pilot project, "Returning Home-Ohio", yielded positive outcomes for program participants. The pilot project, developed jointly by the Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction and the Corporation for Supportive Housing, was designed for disabled prisoners returning from state prison to five Ohio cities. A process, impact, and cost evaluation employing a quasi-experimental design with multiple data sources found that RHO participants were significantly less likely to be rearrested or reincarcerated within one year of release and significantly more likely to be delivered substance abuse and mental health services, relative to a comparison group.

Posted to Web: August 15, 2012Publication Date: August 15, 2012

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