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Featured Research

man walking on rainy streetIn States That Don't Expand Medicaid, Who Gets New Coverage Assistance Under the ACA and Who Doesn't?
Stan Dorn, Matthew Buettgens, Jay Dev

This research provides more evidence that state officials’ decisions against expansion adversely affect already disadvantaged residents. While 5.9 million adults with moderate incomes in nonexpanding states qualify for financial assistance to purchase insurance through the new marketplaces, nearly 6.3 million uninsured residents with lower incomes remain ineligible for help because the state’s Medicaid program was not expanded. The median income of those ineligible for coverage assistance is less than $800 a month, compared to more than $2,000 a month for those eligible to receive subsidies. Read more 

premiumsYear-to-Year Variation in Small-Group Health Insurance Premiums: Double-Digit Annual Increases Have Been Common Over the Past Decade
Linda J. Blumberg, John Holahan

In anticipation of next year's premium announcements and given some information already made public, concerns have surfaced about the potential for double-digit percent increases in nongroup and small-group health insurance premiums. This analysis shows that, although average annual increases in small-group premiums over the past 13 years averaged roughly 5.5 percent, double-digit average premium increases are common for states and large metropolitan areas. Large increases in one year are frequently followed by much smaller increases, or even decreases. This may be especially true as insurers and purchasers navigate the ACA's new insurance environment, moving toward a more stable equilibrium. Read more

\ARESUI1_Vol12CentersHpEAllenAdmin Support FilesWebsite imagesemploymentLittle Evidence of the ACA Increasing Part-Time Work So Far
Bowen Garrett, Robert Kaestner 

This brief examines whether the Affordable Care Act (ACA) has increased part-time work using recent Current Population Survey data. We find a small increase in part-time work in 2014 beyond what would be expected at this point in the economic recovery, attributable to an increase in involuntary part-time work. The increase is not specific to part-time work as defined by the ACA (less than 30 hours per week). Moreover, job transition patterns suggest that the increase in part-time work in 2014 is more likely due to a slow recovery of full-time jobs following the Great Recession than the ACA. Read more

\ARESUI1_Vol12CentersHpEAllenAdmin Support FilesWebsite imagesstethoscope on mapPhysician Network Transparency: How Easy Is it for Consumers to Know What They Are Buying?
Linda J. Blumberg, Rebecca Peters, Erik Wengle, Rachel Arnesen

Urban Institute researchers studied nine marketplace websites (California, Colorado, Connecticut, District of Columbia, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Oregon, Rhode Island and Washington) and healthcare.gov, and offer recommendations on how to improve the transparency of the marketplace sites. Recommendations include creating clear and accurate “hover over” definitions of plan and network types and sizes for consumers scrolling over specific plans, and creating fully functional physician directories for each plan within the marketplace website. Read more

Marketplace competitionMarketplace Competition & Insurance Premiums in the First Year of the Affordable Care Act
Linda J. Blumberg, John Holahan

The Affordable Care Act has resulted in considerable competition. In a large number of markets, this has resulted in lower premiums than expected, though there is considerable variability within each metal tier. This analysis assesses the variation in premiums within markets and the effects of competition in 10 states: Alabama, Arkansas, Colorado, Maryland, Massachusetts, New York, Oregon, Rhode Island, Virginia, and West Virginia. Four of the states have fairly limited competition, while the other six were very competitive, especially in urban, more populated markets. Read more

 

Immediate Issues
The Urban Institute has launched a powerful new research tool, the Health Reform Monitoring Survey (HRMS), to provide timely insights into the Affordable Care Act. From coverage to access to affordability, the HRMS delivers critical data before federal government surveys are available. Read more

Immediate Issues
The Urban Institute is undertaking a comprehensive monitoring and tracking project to examine the implementation and effects of the ACA in ten states. Derived from extensive interviews with state officials and health care stakeholders, this series of reports documents each state’s progress in establishing a health insurance marketplace, implementing insurance reforms, and preparing for an expansion of Medicaid. Read more

New interactive map shows wide local variation in numbers of poor uninsured Americans who would be eligible for Medicaid under the ACA

mapState plans for expanding Medicaid under the ACA

 
Immediate Issues
The reforms implemented in Massachusetts in 2006 became the template for the Affordable Care Act. The Urban Institute has conducted numerous studies of Massachusetts' ambitious effort to transform its health care system. Read more

Health Reform Modeling Capacity

The UI Health Policy Center staff has developed a sophisticated microsimulation model that is used to estimate the impacts of health reforms and to inform policy design choices at the state and national levels.  Learn more about the HIPSM model.
 
All HPC Research
 
In States That Don't Expand Medicaid, Who Gets New Coverage Assistance Under the ACA and Who Doesn't? (Policy Briefs/Timely Analysis of Health Policy Issues)
Stan Dorn, Matthew Buettgens, Jay Dev
Publication Date: October 09, 2014
Little Evidence of the ACA Increasing Part-Time Work So Far (Policy Briefs/Timely Analysis of Health Policy Issues)
Bowen Garrett, Robert Kaestner
Publication Date: September 03, 2014
 


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