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Early Lessons from the Work Support Strategies Initiative: Rhode Island (Research Report)
Heather Hahn, David Kassabian

Work Support Strategies (WSS) is a multiyear, multi-state initiative to implement reforms that help eligible low-income families get and keep a full package of work support benefits, including Medicaid, nutrition assistance (SNAP), and child care assistance. This report describes Rhode Island's accomplishments and lessons learned during the initiative's first year. During this year, the state engaged frontline workers, state leaders and community stakeholders, built close connections with the state’s health reform activities around design of a new eligibility system, identified opportunities for data system improvements and to align eligibility and enrollment requirements and implemented relevant policy changes.

Posted to Web: April 03, 2013Publication Date: April 03, 2013

Early Lessons from the Work Support Strategies Initiative: South Carolina (Research Report)
Brigette Courtot

Work Support Strategies (WSS) is a multiyear, multi-state initiative to implement reforms that help eligible low-income families get and keep a full package of work support benefits, including Medicaid, nutrition assistance (SNAP), and child care assistance. This report describes South Carolina's accomplishments and lessons learned during the initiative's first year. During this year, the two primary agencies involved in delivering work support program benefits in the state began breaking down the barriers between them to create a more efficient, coordinated approach. The state undertook activities to improve the business and technological processes used within each agency while also identifying areas for cross-program alignment.

Posted to Web: April 03, 2013Publication Date: April 03, 2013

Early Lessons from the Work Support Strategies Initiative: New Mexico (Research Report)
David Kassabian, Gregory B. Mills

Work Support Strategies (WSS) is a multiyear, multi-state initiative to implement reforms that help eligible low-income families get and keep a full package of work support benefits, including Medicaid, nutrition assistance (SNAP), and child care assistance. This report describes New Mexico's accomplishments and lessons learned during the initiative's first year. During this year, the state was heavily focused on development of its new automated eligibility system. In addition, New Mexico’s redesign of its eligibility process, undertaken prior to WSS, served as an example for other WSS states.

Posted to Web: April 03, 2013Publication Date: April 03, 2013

Early Lessons from the Work Support Strategies Initiative: Kentucky (Research Report)
Monica Rohacek, Lindsay Giesen

Work Support Strategies (WSS) is a multiyear, multi-state initiative to implement reforms that help eligible low-income families get and keep a full package of work support benefits, including Medicaid, nutrition assistance (SNAP), and child care assistance. This report describes Kentucky's accomplishments and lessons learned during the initiative's first year. In this planning year, the state began building an infrastructure for data management and analysis, explored opportunities for policy alignment across key work supports, designed and tested business process changes in selected local offices, and began creating stronger relationships with external stakeholders.

Posted to Web: April 03, 2013Publication Date: April 03, 2013

Early Lessons from the Work Support Strategies Initiative: Oregon (Research Report)
Jessica F. Compton, Ian Hill, Pamela J. Loprest

Work Support Strategies (WSS) is a multiyear, multi-state initiative to implement reforms that help eligible low-income families get and keep a full package of work support benefits, including Medicaid, nutrition assistance (SNAP), and child care assistance. This report describes Oregon's accomplishments and lessons learned during the initiative's first year. During the planning year, the state continued its numerous activities to streamline benefit eligibility for health programs, align policies across health and other work support programs, and prepare for an automated integrated eligibility system. The major focus of the WSS team was on change management in local field offices.

Posted to Web: April 03, 2013Publication Date: April 03, 2013

Policy Common Ground: Improving State Programs to Foster Work, Well-Being, Self-Sufficiency, and Program Integrity (Press Release)
Urban Institute

Politically diverse state governments can find common ground in a commitment to improving access to work support programs for eligible low-income families, a new Urban Institute report demonstrates.

Posted to Web: April 03, 2013Publication Date: April 03, 2013

Providing Medicaid to Youth Formerly in Foster Care Under the Chafee Option : Informing Implemention of the Affordable Care Act (Research Report)
Mike Pergamit, Marla McDaniel, Vicki Chen, Embry M. Howell, Amelia Hawkins

This report draws lessons from 30 states' implementation of existing optional Medicaid coverage for youth who age out of foster care and applies them to decisions and plans states will consider as they implement new ACA coverage that goes into effect in 2014. Wide variations in how states have implemented the socalled Chafee Option are focused on eligibility criteria, enrollment processes, and recertification processes. States' implementation choices had implications for the frequency with which youth enroll in Medicaid coverage after foster care and in their continuity of coverage over time.

Posted to Web: April 01, 2013Publication Date: November 01, 2012

Racial and Ethnic Differences in Access to Care and Service Use for Children with Coverage through Medicaid and the Children's Health Insurance Program: A Summary (Policy Briefs)
Genevieve M. Kenney, Christine Coyer, Nathaniel Anderson

By 2010, Medicaid and CHIP covered 36 percent of all children and over half of all Hispanic and black children. Generally, the Hispanic, black, and white children served by Medicaid and CHIP appear to have high levels of access to care. However, black and Hispanic children with Medicaid/CHIP coverage may have more problems accessing care, relative to their white counterparts, in two areas: specialty and mental health care. While overall levels of care are similar, the magnitude of difference in specialty care requires further study to explore both the causes and the potential implications of these patterns.

Posted to Web: March 29, 2013Publication Date: March 29, 2013

Racial and Ethnic Differences in Access to Care and Service Use for Children with Coverage through Medicaid and the Children's Health Insurance Program (Discussion Papers/Low Income Working Families)
Genevieve M. Kenney, Christine Coyer, Nathaniel Anderson

By 2010, Medicaid and CHIP covered 36 percent of all children and over half of all Hispanic and black children. Generally, the Hispanic, black, and white children served by Medicaid and CHIP appear to have high levels of access to care. However, black and Hispanic children with Medicaid/CHIP coverage may have more problems accessing care, relative to their white counterparts, in two areas: specialty and mental health care. While overall levels of care are similar, the magnitude of difference in specialty care requires further study to explore both the causes and the potential implications of these patterns.

Posted to Web: March 29, 2013Publication Date: March 29, 2013

The Composition of Children Enrolled in Medicaid and CHIP: A Summary (Policy Briefs)
Christine Coyer, Genevieve M. Kenney

In 2010, Medicaid and CHIP covered over a third of all children in the U.S., over a fifth of white children, and more than half of all Hispanic and black children. Full implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) will lead to increased coverage for these children. This fact sheet summarizes analysis which reveals racial and ethnic variation in residential patterns and health status for children in these programs. Children covered by Medicaid and CHIP in these three groups live in different areas of the country, which can lead to variations in future changes to children’s access to care due to state differences in ACA implementation.

Posted to Web: March 29, 2013Publication Date: March 29, 2013

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