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Early Lessons from the Work Support Strategies Initiative: Oregon (Research Report)
Jessica F. Compton, Ian Hill, Pamela J. Loprest

Work Support Strategies (WSS) is a multiyear, multi-state initiative to implement reforms that help eligible low-income families get and keep a full package of work support benefits, including Medicaid, nutrition assistance (SNAP), and child care assistance. This report describes Oregon's accomplishments and lessons learned during the initiative's first year. During the planning year, the state continued its numerous activities to streamline benefit eligibility for health programs, align policies across health and other work support programs, and prepare for an automated integrated eligibility system. The major focus of the WSS team was on change management in local field offices.

Posted to Web: April 03, 2013Publication Date: April 03, 2013

Policy Common Ground: Improving State Programs to Foster Work, Well-Being, Self-Sufficiency, and Program Integrity (Press Release)
Urban Institute

Politically diverse state governments can find common ground in a commitment to improving access to work support programs for eligible low-income families, a new Urban Institute report demonstrates.

Posted to Web: April 03, 2013Publication Date: April 03, 2013

Providing Medicaid to Youth Formerly in Foster Care Under the Chafee Option : Informing Implemention of the Affordable Care Act (Research Report)
Mike Pergamit, Marla McDaniel, Vicki Chen, Embry M. Howell, Amelia Hawkins

This report draws lessons from 30 states' implementation of existing optional Medicaid coverage for youth who age out of foster care and applies them to decisions and plans states will consider as they implement new ACA coverage that goes into effect in 2014. Wide variations in how states have implemented the socalled Chafee Option are focused on eligibility criteria, enrollment processes, and recertification processes. States' implementation choices had implications for the frequency with which youth enroll in Medicaid coverage after foster care and in their continuity of coverage over time.

Posted to Web: April 01, 2013Publication Date: November 01, 2012

Racial and Ethnic Differences in Access to Care and Service Use for Children with Coverage through Medicaid and the Children's Health Insurance Program: A Summary (Policy Briefs)
Genevieve M. Kenney, Christine Coyer, Nathaniel Anderson

By 2010, Medicaid and CHIP covered 36 percent of all children and over half of all Hispanic and black children. Generally, the Hispanic, black, and white children served by Medicaid and CHIP appear to have high levels of access to care. However, black and Hispanic children with Medicaid/CHIP coverage may have more problems accessing care, relative to their white counterparts, in two areas: specialty and mental health care. While overall levels of care are similar, the magnitude of difference in specialty care requires further study to explore both the causes and the potential implications of these patterns.

Posted to Web: March 29, 2013Publication Date: March 29, 2013

Racial and Ethnic Differences in Access to Care and Service Use for Children with Coverage through Medicaid and the Children's Health Insurance Program (Discussion Papers/Low Income Working Families)
Genevieve M. Kenney, Christine Coyer, Nathaniel Anderson

By 2010, Medicaid and CHIP covered 36 percent of all children and over half of all Hispanic and black children. Generally, the Hispanic, black, and white children served by Medicaid and CHIP appear to have high levels of access to care. However, black and Hispanic children with Medicaid/CHIP coverage may have more problems accessing care, relative to their white counterparts, in two areas: specialty and mental health care. While overall levels of care are similar, the magnitude of difference in specialty care requires further study to explore both the causes and the potential implications of these patterns.

Posted to Web: March 29, 2013Publication Date: March 29, 2013

The Composition of Children Enrolled in Medicaid and CHIP: A Summary (Policy Briefs)
Christine Coyer, Genevieve M. Kenney

In 2010, Medicaid and CHIP covered over a third of all children in the U.S., over a fifth of white children, and more than half of all Hispanic and black children. Full implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) will lead to increased coverage for these children. This fact sheet summarizes analysis which reveals racial and ethnic variation in residential patterns and health status for children in these programs. Children covered by Medicaid and CHIP in these three groups live in different areas of the country, which can lead to variations in future changes to children’s access to care due to state differences in ACA implementation.

Posted to Web: March 29, 2013Publication Date: March 29, 2013

The Composition of Children Enrolled in Medicaid and CHIP: Variation over Time and by Race and Ethnicity (Discussion Papers/Low Income Working Families)
Christine Coyer, Genevieve M. Kenney

In 2010, Medicaid and CHIP covered over a third of all children in the U.S., over a fifth of white children, and more than half of all Hispanic and black children. Full implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) will lead to increased coverage for these children. This paper summarizes analysis which reveals racial and ethnic variation in residential patterns and health status for children in these programs. Children covered by Medicaid and CHIP in these three groups live in different areas of the country, which can lead to variations in future changes to children's access to care due to state differences in ACA implementation.

Posted to Web: March 29, 2013Publication Date: March 29, 2013

Financing Medicare and Medicaid: Testimony Before the Subcommittee on Health Committee on Energy and Commerce U.S. House of Representatives (Testimony)
Judy Feder, Paul Van de Water

Continuing to slow health cost growth is essential; but Medicare and Medicaid are not in crisis. Recent per beneficiary cost growth has slowed so significantly that CBO has dramatically reduced its spending projections for the coming decade. In Medicare, refinement of existing payment mechanisms alongside payment reform can produce additional savings. But as the elderly population doubles over the coming decades, a balanced deficit-reduction package must include new revenues The alternative, changing entitlement structures through vouchers or block grants (or adopting an overly ambitious savings target that could produce the same results), would undermine essential protections and shift or even increase health care costs.

Posted to Web: March 27, 2013Publication Date: March 18, 2013

Can Medicare Be Preserved While Reducing the Deficit? (Policy Briefs/Timely Analysis of Health Policy Issues)
Robert A. Berenson, John Holahan, Stephen Zuckerman

The politically polarized debate over the role of Medicare in deficit and debt reduction often ignores the accumulating evidence that the program can achieve significant spending reductions without sacrificing Medicare's essential protections. We identify policies that correct long-standing gaps in financial protections that Medicare beneficiaries face, promote greater efficiency within payment systems, and recognize the need for additional revenues to pay for the impending surge in the number of beneficiaries in the program. Our illustrative package of reasonable Medicare policy options produces substantial budgetary savings, while preserving and, in some cases, enhancing the program for current and future beneficiaries. Together, these policies would provide savings or new revenues of about $600 billion after paying for permanent repeal of the SGR.

Posted to Web: March 07, 2013Publication Date: March 07, 2013

Emerging Opportunities for Addressing Maternal Depression under Medicaid (Research Brief)
Embry M. Howell, Olivia Golden, William Beardslee

This brief highlights opportunities and challenges for Medicaid programs in providing access to services for depressed mothers. Low income mothers have high rates of untreated depression, posing significant risks for them and their children. Medicaid covers many such mothers and children, and coverage will increase with implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA). Emerging opportunities include new approaches to screening and treatment and new federal funding for integrated health care models and patient-centered medical homes. Major challenges include fragmentation between primary care and mental health care systems and provider shortages. The brief provides suggestions for addressing these challenges.

Posted to Web: March 05, 2013Publication Date: January 24, 2013

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