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View Research by Author - Pamela J. Loprest

Pamela J. Loprest


Senior Fellow
Income and Benefits Policy Center

Dr. Loprest is a labor economist conducting research on policies to enhance the economic well-being of disadvantaged persons, including removing barriers to work and provision of means-tested benefits. She is currently leading the Institute's Unemployment and Recovery Project, studying the impacts of long-term unemployment and policies to address these issues. She is also leading the evaluation of the Institute?s Work Supports Strategies project, examining the impact of state's efforts to increase and ease access for low-income families to public work support benefits. Her other work analyzes private and public policies to support low-income workers, including current and former welfare recipients and adults with disabilities. Dr. Loprest is co-author of three books, including Leaving Welfare: Employment and Well-Being of Families that Left Welfare in the Post-Entitlement Era. Dr. Loprest holds a PhD in economics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Publications


Viewing 1-10 of 87. Most recent posts listed first.Next Page >>

Understanding the Dynamics of Disconnection from Employment and Assistance (Research Report)
Heather Sandstrom, Kristin S. Seefeldt, Sandra Huerta, Pamela J. Loprest

Low-income individuals who are not employed or receiving TANF are often referred to as “disconnected.” This study uses interview data from a sample of 51 disconnected, unmarried mothers from Southeast Michigan and Los Angeles, California to learn about their experiences related to work and benefit receipt. In Michigan, many women had hit the TANF time limit but could not find employment. In Los Angeles, some women preferred to stay home to care for young children, but others lacked child care and work experience. Immigrant mothers struggled without working papers. Despite receiving assistance from different sources, material hardship was quite common.

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Posted to Web: June 02, 2014Publication Date: June 02, 2014

Executive Summary: Understanding the Dynamics of Disconnection from Employment and Assistance (Summary)
Heather Sandstrom, Kristin S. Seefeldt, Sandra Huerta, Pamela J. Loprest

Low-income individuals who are not employed or receiving TANF are often referred to as “disconnected.” This study uses interview data from a sample of 51 disconnected, unmarried mothers from Southeast Michigan and Los Angeles, California to learn about their experiences related to work and benefit receipt. In Michigan, many women had hit the TANF time limit but could not find employment. In Los Angeles, some women preferred to stay home to care for young children, but others lacked child care and work experience. Immigrant mothers struggled without working papers. Despite receiving assistance from different sources, material hardship was quite common.

Read the full report

Posted to Web: June 02, 2014Publication Date: June 02, 2014

Health Profession Opportunity Grants: Year Two Annual Report (2011-2012) (Research Report)
Theresa Anderson, Pamela J. Loprest, Teresa Derrick-Mills, Lauren Eyster, Elaine Morley, Alan Werner

The Health Profession Opportunity Grants (HPOG) Program, established by the Affordable Care Act of 2010, funds training programs in high-demand healthcare professions, targeted to Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) recipients and other low-income individuals. In 2010, the Administration for Children and Families of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services awarded 32 HPOG grantees in 23 states with five-year grants. This Annual Report provides an overview of HPOG grantees, characteristics of participants, activities in which participants were engaged, training and employment outcomes, and how grantee programs continued to evolve in the second year of the program.

Posted to Web: February 18, 2014Publication Date: January 29, 2014

New Perspectives on Transforming States' Health and Human Services: Practical Commentaries on the First Year of the Work Support Strategies Initiative (Research Report)
Olivia Golden, Pamela J. Loprest, Gina Adams, Additional Authors

In this commentary collection, twelve authors - national, state, and county leaders along with research and policy experts -- offer perspectives on lessons from the first year of Work Support Strategies (WSS). WSS is a multi-state initiative to design and test cutting-edge improvements in policy, service delivery, and technology to help low-income working families get and keep the benefits for which they are eligible. Its lessons will interest local, state, and federal officials seeking to integrate health and human services programs (Medicaid, SNAP, and child care assistance); health reform experts; and others who care about programs for low-income families.

Posted to Web: June 05, 2013Publication Date: June 05, 2013

Disconnected Mothers and the Well-Being of Children: A Research Report (Research Report)
Olivia Golden, Marla McDaniel, Pamela J. Loprest, Alexandra Stanczyk

Considerable research attention has been devoted to low-income mothers disconnected from both work and welfare. This body of work has rarely highlighted disconnected mothers' roles as parents and has remained virtually silent about the experiences and well-being of their children. This paper synthesizes research findings to show that many of the circumstances disconnected mothers face pose major risks to children's development and potentially serious consequences for children. We describe potential interventions to help disconnected families by increasing and stabilizing family income, enhancing parenting skills, supporting children directly, and reaching out to disconnected mothers who are not citizens.

Posted to Web: May 07, 2013Publication Date: May 07, 2013

Early Lessons from the Work Support Strategies Initiative: Colorado (Research Report)
Pamela J. Loprest, Lindsay Giesen

Work Support Strategies (WSS) is a multiyear, multi-state initiative to implement reforms that help eligible low-income families get and keep a full package of work support benefits, including Medicaid, nutrition assistance (SNAP), and child care assistance. This report describes Colorado's accomplishments and lessons learned during the initiative’s first year. In this planning year, Colorado improved collaboration between the state human services and health agencies, and between the state and counties. Improved collaboration led to a shortened joint benefit application, quicker processing of SNAP applications and recertifications, cohesive plans for implementing health reform, and supplemental budget funds to improve the statewide automated benefits system.

Posted to Web: April 03, 2013Publication Date: April 03, 2013

Early Lessons from the Work Support Strategies Initiative: North Carolina (Research Report)
Pamela J. Loprest, Lindsay Giesen

Work Support Strategies (WSS) is a multiyear, multi-state initiative to implement reforms that help eligible low-income families get and keep a full package of work support benefits, including Medicaid, nutrition assistance (SNAP), and child care assistance. This report describes North Carolina's accomplishments and lessons learned during the initiative's first year. In this planning year, North Carolina broke down state program silos and instituted a review board to assure cross-program input to policy changes. The state engaged with counties around the implementation of a new benefits eligibility system and encouraging innovation in business processes and piloted alignment of program certification dates.

Posted to Web: April 03, 2013Publication Date: April 03, 2013

Early Lessons from the Work Support Strategies Initiative: Oregon (Research Report)
Jessica F. Compton, Ian Hill, Pamela J. Loprest

Work Support Strategies (WSS) is a multiyear, multi-state initiative to implement reforms that help eligible low-income families get and keep a full package of work support benefits, including Medicaid, nutrition assistance (SNAP), and child care assistance. This report describes Oregon's accomplishments and lessons learned during the initiative's first year. During the planning year, the state continued its numerous activities to streamline benefit eligibility for health programs, align policies across health and other work support programs, and prepare for an automated integrated eligibility system. The major focus of the WSS team was on change management in local field offices.

Posted to Web: April 03, 2013Publication Date: April 03, 2013

Economic Security for Extremely Vulnerable Families: Themes and Options for Workforce Development and Asset Strategies (Research Report)
Olivia Golden, Pamela J. Loprest, Gregory B. Mills

This report explores workforce and asset development strategies for improving the economic security of extremely vulnerable families, those facing major challenges beyond poverty. Evidence drawn from the authors' own research, their review of relevant literature, and learning sessions conducted by the Annie E. Casey Foundation's Center for Community and Economic in Washington, DC, Chicago, and Portland, Maine, suggests that programs can succeed at improving the skills and employability of extremely vulnerable parents and increasing their savings to help tide them through emergencies. The paper also highlights opportunities to inform policy and support targeted research to advance this agenda.

Posted to Web: November 20, 2012Publication Date: November 20, 2012

Labor Market and Demographic Analysis: A National Picture of Short-term Employment Growth by Skill (Research Report)
Pamela J. Loprest, Josh Mitchell

Over the next five years, employment growth is projected to be slightly higher for jobs that require both the lowest and highest levels of education, although job growth is modest to slow across the board. The prospects for low-skill workers in the short-term are best in the leisure and hospitality sector and the professional and business services sector, with additional jobs appearing in construction as that sector continues to recover. A companion portrait of unemployed workers highlights that a disproportionate number of those seeking work are low-skilled.

Posted to Web: June 20, 2012Publication Date: June 20, 2012

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