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View Research by Author - Matthew Stagner

Publications


Viewing 1-7 of 7. Most recent posts listed first.

Evaluation of the Life Skills Training Program: Los Angeles County, California (Research Report)
Mark Courtney, Andrew Zinn, Erica H. Zielewski, Roseana Bess, Karin Malm, Matthew Stagner, Mike Pergamit

This report presents final process and impact study findings from one of four programs evaluated as part of the Multi-Site Evaluation of Foster Youth Programs. Impact findings were based on a two-year follow-up of youth in foster care in Los Angeles County who participated in a random assignment evaluation of the Life Skills Training Program. Youth were 17 years old at the time of random assignment to either a treatment group that was offered access to Life Skills Training or to a control group.

Posted to Web: September 03, 2008Publication Date: July 01, 2008

Evaluation of the Early Start to Emancipation Preparation - Tutoring Program: Los Angeles County (Research Report)
Mark Courtney, Andrew Zinn, Erica H. Zielewski, Roseana Bess, Karin Malm, Matthew Stagner, Mike Pergamit

This report presents final process and impact study findings from one of four programs evaluated as part of the Multi-Site Evaluation of Foster Youth Programs. Impact findings were based on a two-year follow-up of youth who participated in a random assignment evaluation of the Early Start to Emancipation Preparation (ESTEP)Tutoring Program. The program was designed to improve reading and math skills of foster youth aged 14 and 15 who are one to three years behind grade level in reading or math. Youth who participated in the evaluation were randomly assigned to either a treatment group that was offered access to ESTEP-Tutoring or to a control group.

Posted to Web: September 03, 2008Publication Date: July 01, 2008

Service Delivery and Evaluation Design Options for Strengthening and Promoting Healthy Marriages: Investigation of Programs to Strengthen and Support Healthy Marriages (Research Report)
Jennifer Ehrle Macomber, Julie Murray, Matthew Stagner

This report highlights key components of current marriage education programs, identifies opportunities and challenges for expanding services into other service delivery systems, and provides recommendations for evaluations of healthy marriage programs. Researchers conducted a total of 58 telephone discussions with program providers and visited five geographic areas with multiple programs. Findings consider aspects of service delivery settings, target groups served, program scope, funding mechanisms, and collaborative relationships between marriage programs and other service delivery organizations.

Posted to Web: February 11, 2005Publication Date: February 11, 2005

Systematic Review of the Impact of Marriage and Relationship Programs (Research Report)
Jane Reardon-Anderson, Matthew Stagner, Jennifer Ehrle Macomber, Julie Murray

This report presents a systematic review of evaluations of marriage and relationship programs. The review analyzes 39 studies representing the highest quality evidence available in the field of marriage research and finds an average effect size of .68 for improving relationship satisfaction and .26 for improving relationship communication. The studies were screened from over 12,000 marriage research abstracts and more than 500 marriage program evaluations conducted since 1960. The current review supports evidence from previous narrative reviews and meta-analyses that marriage and relationship programs provide benefits for the couples they serve.

Posted to Web: February 11, 2005Publication Date: February 11, 2005

Work, Income, and Well-Being among Long-Term Welfare Recipients: Findings from a Survey of California's "Precarious" Families (Discussion Papers)
Matthew Stagner, Katherine Kortenkamp, Jane Reardon-Anderson

This survey of 546 long-term welfare recipients in two California counties demonstrates great diversity in work, income, and dependency. After nearly a decade of attachment to welfare, working non-poor families achieved self-sufficiency and were out of poverty, working poor families were balancing work and welfare, and nonemployed poor families were still poor and very dependent on welfare. Almost one-third of the families studied had a spouse or partner; almost two-thirds were working; and over two-fifths were out of poverty. A connection to work, without an increase in income, was not related to having a low-risk family environment or improved health.

Posted to Web: September 04, 2002Publication Date: September 04, 2002

What Happens When the School Year Is Over?: The Use and Costs of Child Care for School-Age Children during the Summer Months (Occasional Paper)
Jeffrey Capizzano, Sarah Adelman, Matthew Stagner

Thirty percent of 6- to 12-year-old children with a working primary caretaker participate in "organized programs" such as day camps or summer school during the summer. School-age children spend roughly 10 more hours per week in both relative care and other supervised arrangements during the summer than the school year. Summer child care patterns also vary by the child's age and family income. Relatives are more likely to care for young children and low-income children are more likely to be in summer school. Eleven percent of children ages 6 to 12 are in self-care while the primary caretaker is working. On average, these children spend 6 hours more per week in self-care during the summer (10.3 hours total) than during the school year. Low-income families spend less on child care during the summer compared to the school year while higher-income families spend significantly more. [View the companion Fact Sheet]

Posted to Web: June 04, 2002Publication Date: June 04, 2002

When School's Out, Where Are the Kids? (Commentary)
Jeffrey Capizzano, Matthew Stagner

(Christian Science Monitor) School is almost out. But most kids won't be on the loose. For months, the working parents of millions of 6- to 12-year-olds have been figuring out summer child care. Some have found great camps, and effective summer-school programs, or pressed relatives into service. But others may have to settle for less enriching activities or leave their children unsupervised at times. Are these less fortunate children at risk of physical, social, or emotional harm? Will they lose ground academically?

Posted to Web: May 30, 2002Publication Date: May 30, 2002

 

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