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View Research by Author - Martha R. Burt

Publications


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Youth Count! Process Study (Research Report)
Mike Pergamit, Mary K. Cunningham, Martha R. Burt, Pamela Lee, Brent Howell, Kassie Dumlao Bertumen

Homelessness among unaccompanied youth is a hidden problem: the number of young people who experience homelessness each year is largely unknown. To improve the national response to youth homelessness, policymakers need better data on the magnitude of the problem. Youth Count! is a Federal interagency initiative that aims to improve counts of unaccompanied homeless youth. Nine communities participated in the initiative by expanding their annual homeless point-in-time efforts to increase coverage of homeless youth. Urban Institute conducted a process study of the initiative to identify promising practices that could be adapted and taken to scale to produce credible and useful data nationwide.

Posted to Web: July 30, 2013Publication Date: July 30, 2013

Counting Homeless Youth: Promising Practices from the Youth Count! Initiative (Research Report)
Mike Pergamit, Mary K. Cunningham, Martha R. Burt, Pamela Lee, Brent Howell, Kassie Dumlao Bertumen

Knowing how many youth are homeless is a critical first step in helping them, but it's not easy to count a hidden population. Nine communities across the United States set out to improve their counts through the Youth Count! Initiative. The Urban Institute observed their work and drew out promising practices and lessons for improvement.

Posted to Web: July 30, 2013Publication Date: July 30, 2013

System Change Accomplishments of the Corporation for Supportive Housing's Returning Home Initiative (Research Report)
Jocelyn Fontaine, Caterina Gouvis Roman, Martha R. Burt

In 2006, the Corporation for Supportive Housing launched its Returning Home Initiative (RHI) with two goals: 1) to establish permanent supportive housing as an essential reentry component for formerly incarcerated persons with histories of homelessness, mental illness, and chronic health conditions; and 2) to promote local and national policy changes to integrate the corrections, housing, mental health, and human service systems. The Urban Institute assessed the process of system change stimulated by the RHI activities in three communities that received significant RHI investment and other jurisdictions. In addition, the report identifies challenges and lessons learned from the RHI to date.

Posted to Web: July 19, 2010Publication Date: June 01, 2010

Strategies for Improving Homeless People's Access to Mainstream Benefits and Services (Research Report)
Martha R. Burt, Jenneth Carpenter, Sam Hall

Homeless people in HUD-funded shelters and transitional and permanent supportive housing programs often need benefits and services from welfare, health, mental health, and other mainstream systems to help them stabilize their lives. Many find it hard to access these systems, however. As HUD homeless-related resources have shifted from 60 to 33 percent going to services in the past five years, this study's central question was how communities have compensated. We found that communities evolved smoothing, expanding, and changing mechanisms to reduce access barriers and that highly organized communities were most successful. But federal program regulations limit what local communities can accomplish.

Posted to Web: May 17, 2010Publication Date: March 10, 2010

Life After Transitional Housing for Homeless Families (Research Report)
Martha R. Burt

This report addresses two questions: 1) What happens to homeless families who "graduate" from HUD-funded transitional housing (TH)? and 2) What factors affect housing, employment, and children's well-being after TH? Project sites included Cleveland/Cuyahoga County, Detroit, Houston/Harris County, San Diego City and County, and Seattle/King County. 195 families were interviewed as they left TH, with 179 (92 percent) completing 12 month follow-up interviews. Certain aspects of TH programs and the way that mothers used them affected mothers' education and employment immediately after TH and employment 12 months later. Having a housing voucher at TH exit was the strongest predictor of stable housing during the year following TH, but had no effect on employment outcomes.

Posted to Web: May 03, 2010Publication Date: March 01, 2010

The Corporation for Supportive Housing's Returning Home Initiative: System Change Accomplishments after Three Years (Policy Briefs)
Martha R. Burt, Jocelyn Fontaine, Caterina Gouvis Roman

In 2006, the Corporation for Supportive Housing launched its Returning Home Initiative (RHI) with two goals: 1) to establish permanent supportive housing as an essential reentry component for formerly incarcerated persons with histories of homelessness, mental illness, and chronic health conditions; and 2) to promote local and national policy changes to integrate the corrections, housing, mental health, and human service systems. The Urban Institute assessed the process of system change stimulated by RHI activities in New York, Los Angeles, and Chicago—three communities receiving significant RHI investment. This brief summarizes the influence of RHI-funded activities in each of these cities.

Posted to Web: February 08, 2010Publication Date: November 01, 2009

Repairing the U.S. Social Safety Net (Book)
Martha R. Burt, Demetra Smith Nightingale

The rising poverty and unemployment rates triggered by the recession are stark reminders of the need for a secure social safety net. Such programs should provide economic security, protect vulnerable families, and promote equality—but the United States falls behind other countries in accomplishing these goals. In Repairing the U.S. Social Safety Net, Martha R. Burt and Demetra Smith Nightingale encourage strengthening the safety net and making a national commitment to end poverty.

Posted to Web: October 31, 2009Publication Date: December 30, 2009

Permanent Supportive Housing in the District of Columbia: Taking Stock and Looking Forward (Policy Briefs/In Brief)
Martha R. Burt, Sam Hall

With the generous support of the William S. Abell Foundation, the Urban Institute (UI) surveyed District permanent supportive housing (PSH) agencies and specific PSH projects, asking their staff to detail current projects and future ambitions. This research brief is an analysis of the stock of PSH in the District as of early fall 2008, demographic information on PSH tenants at that time, and a look at how the District might move forward toward fulfilling its commitment to create 2,500 new units of PSH and ultimately eliminating chronic homelessness.

Posted to Web: September 04, 2009Publication Date: August 25, 2009

Widening Effects of the Corporation for Supportive Housing's System-Change Efforts in Los Angeles, 2005–2008 (Research Report)
Martha R. Burt

This, the fourth evaluation report for this project, describes extensive developments in Los Angeles during 2007-2008 and how they build on earlier work. The pipeline for permanent supportive housing is expanding, as are activities to improve the health of homeless people, smooth the transition from jail to community, and address the needs of the most vulnerable homeless people. Numerous coordinating and collaborating structures have begun or are expanding as part of these developments. Cautious optimism is in order compared to four years ago, but there is still a long way to go.

Posted to Web: March 30, 2009Publication Date: March 01, 2009

Reducing the Revolving Door of Incarceration and Homelessness in the District of Columbia: Cost of Services (Research Brief)
Sam Hall, Martha R. Burt, Caterina Gouvis Roman, Jocelyn Fontaine

As part of the Reentry Housing Forum, "Reducing the Revolving Door of Incarceration and Homelessness in the District of Columbia," this paper presents the number of days of jail and shelter and the number of responses by Fire and Emergency Medical Services (FEMS) for people using the D.C. Jail between October 1, 2004 and March 31, 2008, public emergency shelters between October 1, 2005 and September 30, 2007, and FEMS between January 1 and August 31, 2008, as well as the cost of these services to District agencies.

Posted to Web: March 27, 2009Publication Date: March 16, 2009

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