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View Research by Author - Karin Martinson

Publications


Viewing 1-10 of 32. Most recent posts listed first.Next Page >>

Partnering with Employers to Promote Job Advancement for Low-Skill Individuals (Occasional Paper)
Karin Martinson

This paper explores the reasons why employer partnerships are important for improving economic outcomes for both low-skill workers and businesses. It identifies the factors that have hindered the growth of these partnerships as well as promising approaches-incumbent worker training and sectoral training-to build partnerships. It concludes with a discussion of policy considerations for creating and sustaining partnerships with employers to provide skill development opportunities.

Posted to Web: March 02, 2011Publication Date: September 01, 2010

Low-Skill Workers' Access to Quality Green Jobs (Series/Perspectives on Low-Income Working Families)
Karin Martinson, Alexandra Stanczyk, Lauren Eyster

"Green jobs" have garnered attention and support from many circles. This brief discusses strategies for improving access to green jobs for low-skill individuals, particularly jobs that can improve workers' economic standing and better support families. To understand where green jobs for low-skill individuals can be found, we review green industries and occupations and what they pay. Next we identify "good" green jobs that pay enough to support employees' families. Finally we discuss how training for green jobs can equip low-skill workers with needed skills, recommend how to improve these training efforts, and detail examples of innovative programs.

Posted to Web: May 21, 2010Publication Date: May 21, 2010

Characteristics of the Community-Based Job Training Grant (CBJTG) Program (Research Report)
Lauren Eyster, Alexandra Stanczyk, Demetra Smith Nightingale, Karin Martinson, John Trutko

This is the first report from the evaluation of the Community-Based Job Training Grants (CBJTG) being conducted by the Urban Institute, with its partners Johns Hopkins University and Capital Research Corporation. The CBJTG program focuses on building the capacity of community colleges to provide training to workers for high-growth, high-demand industries. The evaluation began in July 2008 with the purpose of documenting the different models and projects that are operating with grant funds, examining and assessing the implementation of grant-funded projects, and identifying innovative features and promising strategies. This report is based on a review of proposals and reports from 211 grantees available through the end of 2008. The information provides a comprehensive picture of the grantee organizations and the activities planned for their CBJTG-funded projects.

Posted to Web: February 03, 2010Publication Date: December 09, 2009

Employers' Perspectives on San Francisco's Paid Sick Leave Policy (Research Report)
Shelley Waters Boots, Karin Martinson, Anna Danziger

This report summarizes strategies San Francisco employers used to implement the nation's first law requiring paid sick days for all employees, based on interviews with a sample of businesses. Although employers faced three new policies that affected staff wages and benefits, they were able to implement the paid sick leave requirement with minimal impacts to their business. The report details employer responses to the law in their operations, staffing, employee benefit packages, and reporting requirements. By assessing employers' perspectives on the operational challenges of the law, the study provides lessons to inform future research and policymaking.

Posted to Web: April 21, 2009Publication Date: March 31, 2009

The Minnesota Integrated Services Project: Final Report on an Initiative to Improve Outcomes for Hard-to-Employ Welfare Recipients (Research Report)
Karin Martinson, Caroline Ratcliffe, Katie Vinopal, Joanna Parnes

The Minnesota Integrated Services Projects focus on improving the delivery of employment, health, and social services to families who receive cash assistance and have serious or multiple barriers to employment. Operating in eight sites, the project seeks to provide comprehensive assessments of participants' barriers, improve access to more complete services that address multiple needs, and coordinate services provided by multiple service systems. This is the final report in an evaluation of the project and describes the changes in the economic outcomes and family-related outcomes of ISP participants over a two-year period, provides estimates of the relationship between ISP participation and participants' employment and MFIP outcomes, and provides conclusions and policy recommendations.

Posted to Web: March 20, 2009Publication Date: March 05, 2009

Q&A: New Income and Poverty Statistics and the Social Safety Net (Opinion)
Gregory Acs, Linda J. Blumberg, Harry Holzer, Pamela J. Loprest, Jennifer Ehrle Macomber, Karin Martinson, Signe-Mary McKernan, Cynthia Perry, Caroline Ratcliffe, Margaret Simms, Margery Austin Turner, Shelley Waters Boots

The Census Bureau released its annual report on income, poverty, and health insurance coverage for the U.S. population on August 26, 2008. According to the report, median household income increased by 1.3 percent in 2007, while the overall poverty rate dipped slightly and the number and percentage of people without health insurance decreased. While the overall numbers were positive, not everyone shared in the economic gains. The number and percentage of children in poverty increased, and households in the lowest 40 percent of the income distribution had no significant income gains.

Posted to Web: August 27, 2008Publication Date: August 27, 2008

Supporting Work for Low-Income People with Significant Challenges (Series/New Safety Net)
Pamela J. Loprest, Karin Martinson

Welfare programs require people to work, but some low-income adults struggle with major personal challenges that make it hard to find or hold down a job. In this essay, Loprest and Martinson recommend both short term changes to current programs and longer term efforts through a program for competitive federal matching block grants to states. These grants would support efforts to integrate programs that alleviate barriers to work with employment services and to evaluate these initiatives so policymakers can better understand what works.

Posted to Web: July 16, 2008Publication Date: July 16, 2008

Helping Poor Working Parents Get Ahead: Federal Funds for New State Strategies and Systems (Series/New Safety Net)
Harry Holzer, Karin Martinson

Low-wage adult workers have trouble getting and keeping higher-paying jobs. Most lack the basic skills and education needed to move up, but certain kinds of assistance might give some the edge they need to break the pattern. In this essay, Holzer and Martinson recommend competitive federal matching block grants that reward states for developing new advancement systems which are linked to state workforce development structures. They would also require partnerships with employers and training providers, including community colleges.

Posted to Web: July 16, 2008Publication Date: July 16, 2008

Helping Poor Working Parents Get Ahead - Summary (Series/New Safety Net)
Harry Holzer, Karin Martinson

Low-wage adult workers have trouble getting and keeping higher-paying jobs. Most lack the basic skills and education needed to move up, but certain kinds of assistance might give some the edge they need to break the pattern. In this summary, Holzer and Martinson recommend competitive federal matching block grants that reward states for developing new advancement systems which are linked to state workforce development structures. They would also require partnerships with employers and training providers, including community colleges.

Posted to Web: July 16, 2008Publication Date: July 16, 2008

Supporting Work for Low-Income People with Significant Challenges - Summary (Series/New Safety Net)
Pamela J. Loprest, Karin Martinson

Welfare programs require people to work, but some low-income adults struggle with major personal challenges that make it hard to find or hold down a job. In this summary, Loprest and Martinson recommend both short-term changes to current programs and longer-term efforts through a program for competitive federal matching block grants to states. These grants would support efforts to integrate programs that alleviate barriers to work with employment services and to evaluate these initiatives so policymakers can better understand what works.

Posted to Web: July 16, 2008Publication Date: July 16, 2008

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