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Viewing 1-10 of 22. Most recent posts listed first.Next Page >>

Implementation Evaluation of the Community-Based Job Training Grant (CBJTG) Program (Research Report)
Lauren Eyster, Teresa Derrick-Mills, John Trutko, Jessica F. Compton, Alexandra Stanczyk, Demetra Smith Nightingale

Community and technical colleges are important training providers for the nation, uniquely positioned to develop a skilled regional workforce, but may lack the capacity to respond to the needs of industry. The Community-Based Job Training Grant program, administered by the U.S. Department of Labor's Employment and Training Administration, was intended to address a critical capacity shortage at community and technical colleges to train workers for high-growth occupations to help strengthen an industry's regional competitiveness. The Urban Institute's implementation evaluation provides a comprehensive picture of the grants and highlights innovations, successes and challenges, and trends and patterns across the grants

Posted to Web: August 30, 2013Publication Date: August 30, 2013

Implementation and Early Training Outcomes of the High Growth Job Training Initiative: Final Report (Research Report)
Lauren Eyster, Demetra Smith Nightingale, Burt S. Barnow, Carolyn T. O'Brien, John Trutko, Daniel Kuehn

The High Growth Job Training Initiative (HGJTI) was a national grant program administered by the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL), Employment and Training Administration (ETA). Between 2001 and 2007, more than 160 grants were awarded to establish industry-focused job training and related projects designed to meet the industry’s workforce challenges. This report is the third and final in a series from the national evaluation of the HGJTI conducted by the Urban Institute, the Institute for Policy Studies at Johns Hopkins University, and Capital Research Corporation. This report documents the national initiative, describes the structure and implementation of projects by selected grantees, and provides nonexperimental analysis of the early impacts of job training in selected HGJTI-funded programs. The analysis relies on a review of grant applications and quarterly reports; visits to nine selected grantee sites; data collected from grantee training programs; quarterly earnings data from state unemployment insurance wage records; and administrative data from state and local public workforce system agencies.

Posted to Web: January 09, 2012Publication Date: June 01, 2011

Characteristics of the Community-Based Job Training Grant (CBJTG) Program (Research Report)
Lauren Eyster, Alexandra Stanczyk, Demetra Smith Nightingale, Karin Martinson, John Trutko

This is the first report from the evaluation of the Community-Based Job Training Grants (CBJTG) being conducted by the Urban Institute, with its partners Johns Hopkins University and Capital Research Corporation. The CBJTG program focuses on building the capacity of community colleges to provide training to workers for high-growth, high-demand industries. The evaluation began in July 2008 with the purpose of documenting the different models and projects that are operating with grant funds, examining and assessing the implementation of grant-funded projects, and identifying innovative features and promising strategies. This report is based on a review of proposals and reports from 211 grantees available through the end of 2008. The information provides a comprehensive picture of the grantee organizations and the activities planned for their CBJTG-funded projects.

Posted to Web: February 03, 2010Publication Date: December 09, 2009

Implementation Analysis of High Growth Job Training Initiative (HGJTI) Programs (Research Report)
Demetra Smith Nightingale, Lauren Eyster, John Trutko, Carolyn T. O'Brien, Kate Chambers

The High Growth Job Training Initiative (HGJTI) is a national grants program administered by the U.S. Department of Labor Employment and Training Administration. Between 2001 and 2006, more than 150 grants were awarded to establish demand-driven job training and related projects designed to meet employer-defined workforce challenges. This report is the second in a series from the evaluation of the HGJTI being conducted by the Urban Institute, Johns Hopkins University, and Capital Research Corporation. This report documents the national initiative and describes the structure and implementation of projects developed by selected grantees. The information presented is based on reviews of grantee applications and quarterly reports, and on site visits to six grantees.

Posted to Web: November 05, 2008Publication Date: June 01, 2008

Partners for Fragile Families Demonstration Projects: Employment and Child Support Outcomes and Trends (Research Report)
Karin Martinson, Demetra Smith Nightingale, Pamela A. Holcomb, Burt S. Barnow, John Trutko

The Partnership for Fragile Families Demonstration projects, operating in 13 sites across the country, provided a range of services aimed at increasing the capacity of young, economically disadvantaged fathers in becoming financial and emotional resources to their children and sought to reduce poverty and welfare dependence. As part of a multi-component evaluation, this report examines how participants fared in two key areas: (1) employment rates and earnings levels and (2) the establishment of child support orders and the payment of child support.

Posted to Web: October 31, 2007Publication Date: October 31, 2007

Implementation and Sustainability: Emerging Lessons from the Early High Growth Job Training Initiative (HGJTI) Grants (Research Report)
John Trutko, Carolyn T. O'Brien, Pamela A. Holcomb, Demetra Smith Nightingale

The President's High Growth Job Training Initiative (HGTJI) is a major national effort to encourage the development of market-driven strategies to address critical workforce challenges as defined by business and industry. As part of the Urban Institute's evaluation of this program, this first report documents the lessons, experiences and sustainability of 20 of the earliest HGJTI grantees as told by the project administrators. The purpose of the report is to summarize the major implementation lessons emerging from the early grantees and document the extent to which projects continue after the end of the grant.

Posted to Web: October 02, 2007Publication Date: April 01, 2007

The Implementation of the Partners for Fragile Families Demonstration Projects (Research Report)
Karin Martinson, John Trutko, Demetra Smith Nightingale, Pamela A. Holcomb, Burt S. Barnow

This report describes the design and implementation of the Partners for Fragile Families (PFF) demonstration projects. Operating in 13 sites across the country, PFF provided a range of services aimed at increasing the capacity of young, economically disadvantaged fathers in becoming financial and emotional resources to their children and sought to reduce poverty and welfare dependence. The report examines the programs structure and institutional partnerships; participant characteristics; recruitment and enrollment efforts; the nature of employment, peer support, parenting, and child support-related services provided through the initiatives; and implementation challenges and lessons.

Posted to Web: August 03, 2007Publication Date: June 08, 2007

Volume I: Final Synthesis Report: Study to Assess Funding, Accountability, and One-Stop Delivery Systems in Adult Education (Research Report)
Nancy M. Pindus, Laudan Y. Aron, Jake Cowan, Harry P. Hatry, Shinta Herwantoro Hernandez, Mary Kopczynski Winkler, Robin Koralek, John Trutko, Burt S. Barnow

The Workforce Investment Act (WIA) of 1998 (P.L. 105-220) recognized the relationship between adult education and workforce development and the need for accountability in all literacy, training, and employment programs. Enacted as Title II of WIA, the Adult Education and Family Literacy Act (AEFLA) required substantial changes in the operations of state and local adult education programs, including allocation of funds, accountability and performance measurement, and the relationship between adult education and one-stop delivery systems. This report synthesizes information from a survey of all state directors of adult education and site visits to nine local programs in five states. Findings relate primarily to the first 18 months of AEFLA implementation.

Posted to Web: March 16, 2006Publication Date: March 16, 2006

Volume II: Detailed Methods and Findings: Study to Assess Funding, Accountability, and One-Stop Delivery Systems in Adult Education (Research Report)
Nancy M. Pindus, Laudan Y. Aron, Jake Cowan, Harry P. Hatry, Shinta Herwantoro Hernandez, Mary Kopczynski Winkler, Robin Koralek, John Trutko, Burt S. Barnow

The Workforce Investment Act (WIA) of 1998 (P.L. 105-220) recognized the relationship between adult education and workforce development and the need for accountability in all literacy, training, and employment programs. Enacted as Title II of WIA, the Adult Education and Family Literacy Act (AEFLA) required substantial changes in the operations of state and local adult education programs, including allocation of funds, accountability and performance measurement, and the relationship between adult education and one-stop delivery systems. This report synthesizes information from a survey of all state directors of adult education and site visits to nine local programs in five states. Findings relate primarily to the first 18 months of AEFLA implementation.

Posted to Web: March 16, 2006Publication Date: March 16, 2006

Welfare-to-Work Grants Programs: Adjusting to Changing Circumstances (Research Report)
Demetra Smith Nightingale, Carolyn T. O'Brien, Michael Egner, Nancy M. Pindus, John Trutko

This is one of several reports based on the national evaluation of the Welfare-to-Work grants program. Congress established the Welfare-to-Work (WtW) grants program as part of the Balanced Budget Act (BBA) of 1997. The three billion dollar initiative was intended to support programs, especially in high-poverty communities, to assist the least employable, most disadvantaged welfare recipients make the transition from welfare to work. These funds were also available to help low-income noncustodial parents increase their earnings and better support their children. The purpose of this report is to document how grantees have adapted as they approach or reach the ends of their WtW grant periods and how other conditions in 2002 and 2003--particularly the slow economy and any state policies related to TANF or the Workforce Investment Act (WIA)--have affected their programs. The report discusses the legacy and lessons of WtW from the perspective of grantee agency administrators in the study sites.

Posted to Web: November 01, 2003Publication Date: November 01, 2003

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