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View Research by Author - Jane Reardon-Anderson

Publications


Viewing 1-8 of 8. Most recent posts listed first.

A Profile of Low-Income Working Immigrant Families (Policy Briefs/NSAF)
Randolph Capps, Michael E. Fix, Everett Henderson, Jane Reardon-Anderson

Immigrants compose a large and growing share of U.S. workers, and of low-income working families. In 2001 immigrants were one fifth of all low-wage workers, and immigrant families were one-quarter of all low-income working families. Like other low-income families, immigrants face economic hardship and need work supports such as tax credits, food, housing assistance, health care, and child care. Immigrant families, however, are less likely to be eligible for or have access to needed benefits such as the Earned Income Tax Credit, Medicaid, Food Stamps, and child care subsidies.

Posted to Web: June 30, 2005Publication Date: June 30, 2005

Systematic Review of the Impact of Marriage and Relationship Programs (Research Report)
Jane Reardon-Anderson, Matthew Stagner, Jennifer Ehrle Macomber, Julie Murray

This report presents a systematic review of evaluations of marriage and relationship programs. The review analyzes 39 studies representing the highest quality evidence available in the field of marriage research and finds an average effect size of .68 for improving relationship satisfaction and .26 for improving relationship communication. The studies were screened from over 12,000 marriage research abstracts and more than 500 marriage program evaluations conducted since 1960. The current review supports evidence from previous narrative reviews and meta-analyses that marriage and relationship programs provide benefits for the couples they serve.

Posted to Web: February 11, 2005Publication Date: February 11, 2005

The Health and Well-Being of Young Children of Immigrants (Research Report)
Randolph Capps, Michael E. Fix, Jason Ost, Jane Reardon-Anderson, Jeffrey S. Passel

There are 5.1 million young children of immigrants, representing 22 percent of all U.S. children under age 6. While 93 percent of these children are U.S.-born citizens, 29 percent have undocumented parents. Young children of immigrants with two parents are three times as likely to be poor as children of natives, and so marriage is not an antidote to poverty for these children. Despite higher economic hardship, young children of immigrants are less likely than native counterparts to receive TANF, food stamps, or housing assistance. They are also less likely to be in center-based child care, potentially limiting their preparation for schooling. [View the corresponding press release]

Posted to Web: February 08, 2005Publication Date: February 08, 2005

The Health and Well-Being of Young Children of Immigrants (Policy Briefs/Immigrant Families and Workers)
Randolph Capps, Michael E. Fix, Jason Ost, Jane Reardon-Anderson, Jeffrey S. Passel

This brief summarizes the findings of the report, "The Health and Well-Being of Young Children of Immigrants", which focuses on the 5.1 million children of immigrants under age 6 in the United States. Young children of immigrants with two parents are three times as likely to be poor as children of natives, and so marriage is not an antidote to poverty for these children. Despite higher economic hardship, young children of immigrants are less likely than native counterparts to receive TANF, food stamps, or housing assistance. They are also less likely to be in center-based child care, potentially limiting their preparation for schooling.

Posted to Web: February 01, 2005Publication Date: February 01, 2005

Assessing Implementation of the 2002 Farm Bill's Legal Immigrant Food Stamp Restorations: Final Report to the United States Department of Agriculture Food and Nutrition Service (Research Report)
Randolph Capps, Robin Koralek, Katherine Lotspeich, Michael E. Fix, Pamela A. Holcomb, Jane Reardon-Anderson

The 2002 Farm Bill's legal immigrant eligibility restorations took place against a backdrop of high, steady levels of immigration. By the end of 2003, short-term targets for increased non-citizen participation in the Food Stamp Program had been met -- over 150,000 legal immigrants were added to the rolls across eight study states (well on schedule to meet the goal of enrolling 400,000 legal immigrants nationally by 2006). While the Farm Bill represents a significant policy success in terms of supplanting the legal immigrant restrictions of PRWORA, substantial barriers to immigrant food stamp participation remain.

Posted to Web: November 04, 2004Publication Date: November 04, 2004

Children of Immigrants Show Slight Reductions in Poverty, Hardship (Series/Snapshots of America's Families III)
Randolph Capps, Michael E. Fix, Jane Reardon-Anderson

The 2002 National Survey of America's Families shows that the share of low-income children who are children of immigrants increased from 22 percent in 1999 to 26 percent in 2002. The poverty rate for children of immigrants fell from 24 to 22 percent.

Posted to Web: November 07, 2003Publication Date: November 07, 2003

The Health and Well-Being of Children in Immigrant Families (Policy Briefs/NSAF)
Jane Reardon-Anderson, Randolph Capps, Michael E. Fix

The authors analyze data from the 1999 National Survey of America's Families and find that immigrant families have important strengths but face significant challenges. Among the strengths: a high proportion of children of immigrants live in two-parent families compared to children of natives. While children of immigrants are more likely to live in low-income families, these families are more likely to have full-time workers than children of low-income native families. Among the challenges: Children of immigrants living in two parent families are substantially more likely to be low-income than children of natives who live in two-parent families because immigrant workers receive lower wages and the second parent is less likely to work. Children of immigrants are more likely to be in fair or poor health and not have a usual source of health care. The researchers conclude that policies intended to promote work and marriage may be less helpful to immigrants than those intended to boost income through work supports. [Read the press release]

Posted to Web: November 26, 2002Publication Date: November 26, 2002

Work, Income, and Well-Being among Long-Term Welfare Recipients: Findings from a Survey of California's "Precarious" Families (Discussion Papers)
Matthew Stagner, Katherine Kortenkamp, Jane Reardon-Anderson

This survey of 546 long-term welfare recipients in two California counties demonstrates great diversity in work, income, and dependency. After nearly a decade of attachment to welfare, working non-poor families achieved self-sufficiency and were out of poverty, working poor families were balancing work and welfare, and nonemployed poor families were still poor and very dependent on welfare. Almost one-third of the families studied had a spouse or partner; almost two-thirds were working; and over two-fifths were out of poverty. A connection to work, without an increase in income, was not related to having a low-risk family environment or improved health.

Posted to Web: September 04, 2002Publication Date: September 04, 2002

 

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