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Emily Lawton


Research Associate
Health Policy Center

Emily Lawton is a Research Associate in the Health Policy Center of the Urban Institute. She has experience analyzing complex survey data sets and has worked on a variety of health policy issues with a particular focus on Medicaid related research. Her recent research has included examining changes in Medicaid enrollment and expenditures over time and the underlying factors driving Medicaid spending in recent years and investigating whether Massachusetts's health care reform led to a dampening of employment within the state. In another recent project, she examined Medicaid enrollment and spending attributable to federal core enrollees versus state expansion enrollees and mandatory and optional health benefit spending, cited in the recent Supreme Court case on the constitutionality of the Affordable Care Act. Prior to joining the Urban Institute, she graduated from Connecticut College with dual degrees in mathematics and psychology and held several internships before graduating, including one at the National Center for Health Statistics.

Publications


Viewing 1-9 of 9. Most recent posts listed first.

Medicaid and CHIP Managed Care Payment Methods and Spending in 20 States: Final Report to the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (Research Report)
Brigette Courtot, Teresa A. Coughlin, Emily Lawton

This study of Medicaid and CHIP managed care programs in 20 states indicates that capitation rate-setting became more data-driven and transparent during the time period 2001-2010. Benefit packages were fairly consistent over time and among states, with carve outs in every state for a least one acute service. Total spending on managed care services for Medicaid enrollees varied considerably across states and subgroups; nondisabled children had the lowest average monthly spending and adults with disabilities had the highest.

Posted to Web: October 17, 2013Publication Date: December 01, 2012

Enrollment-Driven Expenditure Growth: Medicaid Spending during the Economic Downturn, FY 2007-2011 (Research Report)
Katherine Young, Rachel Garfield, Lisa Clemans-Cope, Emily Lawton, John Holahan

This report presents data on changes in Medicaid's enrollment and spending between federal fiscal year 2007 and federal fiscal year 2011, a period which includes the worst economic downturn in the United States since the Great Depression of the 1930s. The paper also examines what factors drove Medicaid spending over the period, and concludes that overall spending growth from 2007 to 2011 was driven largely by the enrollment growth that resulted from many people losing jobs and income during the recession. However, on a per enrollee basis, Medicaid spending has grown more slowly than other sectors of the health system.

Posted to Web: April 24, 2013Publication Date: April 24, 2013

Will the Affordable Care Act Be a Job Killer? (Policy Briefs/Health Policy Briefs)
Lisa Dubay, John Holahan, Sharon K. Long, Emily Lawton

The question of whether the Affordable Care Act (ACA) will lead to job loss was revisited in the first presidential debate. This brief summarizes what would be expected based on economic theory and the evidence under health reform in Massachusetts, the template for the ACA. Employment trends in Massachusetts closely mirrored those of the rest of the nation in the periods before and after reform, while gross domestic product grew at a faster rate than in the rest of the nation after reform. The evidence suggests that the ACA will have little effect on employment and may support stronger economic growth.

Posted to Web: October 22, 2012Publication Date: October 22, 2012

Will Health Reform Lead to Job Loss? Evidence from Massachusetts Says No. (Policy Briefs/Timely Analysis of Health Policy Issues)
Lisa Dubay, Sharon K. Long, Emily Lawton

In 2006, Massachusetts enacted an ambitious health care reform bill that greatly expanded insurance coverage in the state. This brief explores whether the State's reform initiative led to a dampening of employment and, thus, economic growth. Employment trends in Massachusetts immediately after health reform was implemented and over the period of the recession closely mirrored those of comparison states that had similar employment patterns to Massachusetts prior to health reform. The evidence suggests that Massachusetts has achieved its goal of near-universal health insurance coverage under its 2006 health reform initiative, with no indication of negative job consequences.

Posted to Web: June 07, 2012Publication Date: June 07, 2012

Enrollment-Driven Expenditure Growth: Medicaid Spending during the Economic Downturn, FFY2007-2010 (Research Report)
Rachel Garfield, Lisa Clemans-Cope, Emily Lawton, John Holahan

This report presents data on changes in Medicaid's enrollment and spending between federal fiscal year 2007 and federal fiscal year 2010, a period which includes the worst economic downturn in the United States since the Great Depression of the 1930s. The paper also examines what factors drove Medicaid spending over the period, and concludes that overall spending growth from 2007 to 2010 was driven largely by the enrollment growth that resulted from many people losing jobs and income during the recession. However, on a per enrollee basis, Medicaid spending has grown more slowly than other sectors of the health system.

Posted to Web: May 14, 2012Publication Date: May 11, 2012

Undocumented Immigrants, Left Out Of Health Reform, Likely To Continue To Grow As Share Of The Uninsured (Commentary)
Stephen Zuckerman, Timothy Waidmann, Emily Lawton

The increase in undocumented immigration between 1999 and 2007 contributed to an increase in the number of uninsured people in the United States. During this period, the number of undocumented immigrants increased from an estimated 8.5 million to 11.8 million, leading to an estimated additional 1.8 million uninsured. Undocumented immigrants accounted for one in seven of the uninsured in 2007, up from one in eight in 1999. Since undocumented immigrants will not be eligible for public insurance or private coverage obtained through exchanges under the Affordable Care Act, they will eventually constitute a larger percentage of the uninsured population.

Posted to Web: November 01, 2011Publication Date: October 30, 2011

Health Insurance Coverage in New York, 2009 (Research Report)
Juliana Macri, Emily Lawton, Christine Coyer, Victoria Lynch, Genevieve M. Kenney, Additional Authors

This latest edition of our annual chartbook series for New York State features detailed information about differences in insurance coverage and uninsurance around New York State and within New York City. Overall, 12.9 percent of New Yorkers (889,000 total) under the age of 65 lacked health insurance in 2009, unchanged from the previous year despite an ongoing recession. Data for 14 separate regions across New York State, including the five boroughs of New York City and for 55 separate neighborhoods within the city itself show enormous variation in health insurance coverage across the state.

Posted to Web: October 11, 2011Publication Date: September 01, 2011

House Republican Budget Plan: State-by-State Impact of Changes in Medicaid Financing (Research Report)
John Holahan, Matthew Buettgens, Vicki Chen, Caitlin Carroll, Emily Lawton

The House Republican Budget Plan would make major changes to the structure of the Medicaid program. In this brief we estimate reductions in federal Medicaid spending due to both the repeal of the Affordable Care Act on Medicaid and the block grant provisions themselves. We find that the House Budget Plan would reduce federal spending by $1.4 billion between 2012 and 2021, a cut of 34 percent relative to current law. The impacts are greatest in states that would have the largest coverage expansions due to the Affordable Care Act. We also estimate the loss of Medicaid coverage that would be likely under different assumptions of states’ success in constraining spending. Finally we estimate the increase in state expenditures that would be necessary to maintain their current programs even assuming some cost containment success.

Posted to Web: May 10, 2011Publication Date: May 10, 2011

Medicaid Spending Growth over the Last Decade and the Great Recession, 2000-2009 (Research Report)
John Holahan, Lisa Clemans-Cope, Emily Lawton, David Rousseau

This report examines Medicaid spending growth nationally during the last decade, with a focus on growth during the recession of 2007 to 2009. The recession-driven enrollment growth in recent years drove program spending to increase faster than national health spending overall, but on a per enrollee basis the growth in Medicaid spending has remained lower than the rise in private insurance premiums and overall national health expenditures. The recession-driven increase in Medicaid enrollment has been the primary cause of the increase in overall Medicaid spending.

Posted to Web: April 06, 2011Publication Date: February 01, 2011

 

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