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View Research by Author - Douglas A. Wissoker

Douglas A. Wissoker


Senior Research Associate
Executive Office Research

Ph.D., Economics, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Publications


Viewing 1-10 of 45. Most recent posts listed first.Next Page >>

Appointment Availability after Increases in Medicaid Payments for Primary Care (Article)
Daniel Polsky, Michael Richards, Simon Basseyn, Douglas A. Wissoker, Genevieve M. Kenney, Stephen Zuckerman, Karin Rhodes

This study examines the effect of increased Medicaid reimbursements for primary care services in 2013 and 2014, a key provision of Affordable Care Act, on access to primary care. The researchers measured the availability of and waiting times for appointments for Medicaid enrollees and privately insured individuals in 10 states during two periods: from November 2012 through March 2013 and from May 2014 through July 2014. Between the two time periods, the availability of primary care appointments for Medicaid beneficiaries increased from 58.7 percent to 66.4 percent, while no changes were observed for the privately insured. During the same periods, waiting times to a scheduled new-patient appointment remained stable. These results suggest that increased Medicaid reimbursement to primary care providers was associated with improved appointment availability for Medicaid enrollees without generating longer waiting times.

Posted to Web: January 23, 2015Publication Date: January 21, 2015

The Need to Reform Medicare's Payments to Skilled Nursing Facilities is as Strong as Ever (Research Report)
Carol Carter, Bowen Garrett, Douglas A. Wissoker

Well-documented shortcomings in Medicare's payment system for skilled nursing facilities (SNFs) have prompted many revisions to the system. This study finds that Medicare's payments to SNFs for therapy and non-therapy ancillary (NTA) services are the least accurate they have been since 2006. Payments are less reflective of cost differences across both stays and facilities and payments are less proportional to costs. An alternative design that would base payments on patient characteristics and establish separate payments for NTA services would increase payment accuracy and dampen the incentives to furnish excessive therapy and avoid patients with complex medical needs for financial gain.

Posted to Web: January 15, 2015Publication Date: January 15, 2015

Taking Stock: Health Insurance Coverage under the ACA as of September 2014 (Policy Briefs/Health Policy Briefs)
Sharon K. Long, Michael Karpman, Adele Shartzer, Douglas A. Wissoker, Genevieve M. Kenney, Stephen Zuckerman, Nathaniel Anderson, Katherine Hempstead

This brief examines continued changes in the uninsurance rate for nonelderly adults through September 2014, when the most recent round of the Health Reform Monitoring Survey (HRMS) was completed. Though the marketplace open enrollment period ended in April 2014, those who have since experienced a qualifying life event, such as marriage, divorce, birth of a child, or loss of coverage, have been eligible to apply for coverage through the marketplace during a special enrollment period. Also, coverage may change because enrollment in Medicaid is available to eligible adults any time during the year, and the nation's ongoing economic recovery may cause gains in private coverage. Moreover, states' continued processing of their Medicaid application backlogs may have led to increased Medicaid enrollment. Simultaneously, other factors may dampen coverage gains, such as a decline in coverage because some Marketplace plan enrollees failed to pay their premiums.

Posted to Web: December 05, 2014Publication Date: December 05, 2014

A First Look at Children's Health Insurance Coverage under the ACA in 2014 (Policy Briefs/Health Policy Briefs)
Genevieve M. Kenney, Joan Alker, Nathaniel Anderson, Stacey McMorrow, Sharon K. Long, Douglas A. Wissoker, Lisa Clemans-Cope, Lisa Dubay, Michael Karpman, Tricia Brooks

Beginning in June 2013, the Urban Institute's Health Reform Monitoring Survey (HRMS), which was designed to provide early feedback on implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), has been tracking changes in health insurance coverage and other outcomes for children under the ACA. In contrast to adults, uninsured rates for children had been declining in the decade before the ACA's passage, largely because of the expansion of public coverage (Medicaid and the Children's Health Insurance Program) which is substantially generous and draws high participation among children. Estimates derived from HRMS children's supplement suggest that uninsured rates for children had not changed by June 2014 from their pre-ACA levels, though there are reasons to expect that children's coverage will grow in future years.

Posted to Web: September 09, 2014Publication Date: September 09, 2014

Taking Stock: Health Insurance Coverage for Parents under the ACA in 2014 (Policy Briefs/Health Policy Briefs)
Genevieve M. Kenney, Nathaniel Anderson, Sharon K. Long, Lisa Dubay, Stacey McMorrow, Lisa Clemans-Cope, Michael Karpman, Douglas A. Wissoker

In this brief, we use data from the June 2014 Health Reform Monitoring Survey (HRMS) to examine changes in health insurance coverage for parents since September 2013. The HRMS was designed to provide early feedback on ACA implementation to complement the more robust assessments that will be possible when the federal surveys release their estimates of changes in health insurance coverage later in 2014 and in 2015. We find that the uninsurance rate declined by 14.4 percent for parents nationally between September 2013 and June 2014 and by 33.3 percent for parents in states that expanded Medicaid. As the ACA moves forward, it will be important to assess (1) whether these coverage gains translate into improvements in access to care, health status, and financial well-being for parents and (2) the extent of positive spillover effects on parents' children.

Posted to Web: September 09, 2014Publication Date: September 09, 2014

Taking Stock at Mid-Year: Health Insurance Coverage under the ACA as of June 2014 (Policy Briefs/Health Policy Briefs)
Sharon K. Long, Genevieve M. Kenney, Stephen Zuckerman, Douglas A. Wissoker, Adele Shartzer, Michael Karpman, Nathaniel Anderson, Katherine Hempstead

The Affordable Care Act (ACA) has brought major changes to the US health insurance system: In January 2014, Medicaid was expanded to nearly all adults with family incomes at or below 138 percent of the federal poverty level in 24 states and the District of Columbia, and enrollment under the new health insurance Marketplaces officially began in all states and the District of Columbia. We use the June 2014 Health Reform Monitoring Survey (HRMS) to examine changes in health insurance coverage since the beginning of the previous year for nonelderly adults. The HRMS was designed to provide early feedback on ACA implementation to complement the more robust assessments that will be possible when the federal surveys release their estimates of changes in health insurance coverage later in 2014 and in 2015.

Posted to Web: July 29, 2014Publication Date: July 29, 2014

Who Are the Remaining Uninsured as of June 2014? (Policy Briefs/Health Policy Briefs)
Adele Shartzer, Genevieve M. Kenney, Sharon K. Long, Katherine Hempstead, Douglas A. Wissoker

It is now widely agreed that the number of nonelderly (age 18–64) uninsured adults has fallen dramatically since the Affordable Care Act’s (ACA’s) Marketplace open enrollment began. According to the June 2014 Health Reform Monitoring Survey (HRMS), the number of uninsured adults fell by an estimated 8 million between September 2013 and June 2014, with proportionately larger coverage gains among low- and middle-income adults and in states that implemented the ACA’s Medicaid expansion. However, 13.9 percent of adults still remain uninsured as of June 2014. In this brief, we use data from the June 2014 wave of the HRMS to assess the characteristics of those who remain uninsured, providing valuable information for ongoing Medicaid outreach and enrollment efforts, as well as preparations for the next open enrollment period in the Marketplaces.

Posted to Web: July 29, 2014Publication Date: July 29, 2014

QuickTake: Number of Uninsured Adults Continues to Fall under the ACA: Down by 8.0 Million in June 2014 (Fact Sheet / Data at a Glance)
Sharon K. Long, Genevieve M. Kenney, Stephen Zuckerman, Douglas A. Wissoker, Adele Shartzer, Michael Karpman, Nathaniel Anderson

The Urban Institute's Health Reform Monitoring Survey (HRMS) has been tracking insurance coverage since the first quarter of 2013. This QuickTake reports on how the uninsurance rate changed through early June 2014. These results track changes in coverage following the Affordable Care Act's first open enrollment period, which ended on March 31, 2014.

Posted to Web: July 10, 2014Publication Date: July 10, 2014

Early Estimates Indicate Rapid Increase in Health Insurance Coverage under the ACA: A Promising Start (Policy Briefs/Health Policy Briefs)
Sharon K. Long, Genevieve M. Kenney, Stephen Zuckerman, Douglas A. Wissoker, Dana E. Goin, Katherine Hempstead, Michael Karpman, Nathaniel Anderson

By the end of March, enrollment in Marketplace plans created by the Affordable Care Act (ACA) was reported at just over 7 million and the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) reported that Medicaid enrollment increased between the beginning of October 2013 and the end of February 2014. However, neither the Marketplace enrollment figures nor the CMS Medicaid report provide an accurate picture of how many uninsured people have gained coverage since open enrollment began, because both sets of enrollment figures may include newly insured people as well as those who had other sources of coverage before 2014. We use the March 2014 Health Reform Monitoring Survey (HRMS) to examine changes in health insurance coverage in early March 2014 relative to coverage over the prior year, including more disaggregated information on coverage changes and additional details on the statistical precision of the estimates.

Posted to Web: April 15, 2014Publication Date: April 15, 2014

Primary Care Access for New Patients on the Eve of Health Care Reform (Article)
Genevieve M. Kenney, Douglas A. Wissoker, Additional Authors

This study uses a simulated patient approach to assess appointment availability and wait times for new primary care appointments in late 2012/early 2013 by insurance status and state. Although most primary care physicians are accepting new patients, access varies widely across states and insurance status. Outreach programs are needed, not only to help patients enroll but also to identify practices accepting new patients within each plan's network. Tracking new patient appointment availability over time can inform policies designed to strengthen primary care capacity and enhance the effectiveness of the coverage expansions with the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act.

Posted to Web: April 09, 2014Publication Date: April 07, 2014

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