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View Research by Author - Cynthia Perry



Publications


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Disability Onset Among Working Parents: Earnings Drops, Compensating Income Sources and Health Insurance Coverage (Discussion Papers/Low Income Working Families)
Cynthia Perry, Genevieve M. Kenney, Bogdan Tereshchenko

This paper examines work-limiting disability using the 1996 and 2001 panels of the Survey of Income and Program Participation. Nearly 10 percent of employed parents developed or had a recurring disability over the course of the panel. For about a quarter of this group, earnings dropped by more than 25 percent of family income, with other income sources offsetting only a small fraction of lost earnings. In addition, workers who hold health insurance policies through their employer were less likely to reduce hours worked or leave their job following disability onset, effects consistent with job lock.

Posted to Web: March 25, 2009Publication Date: March 23, 2009

Nine in Ten: Using the Tax System to Enroll Eligible, Uninsured Children into Medicaid and SCHIP (Research Report)
Stan Dorn, Bowen Garrett, Cynthia Perry, Lisa Clemans-Cope, Aaron Lucas

In 2004, 89.4 percent of uninsured children who qualified for Medicaid or the State Children's Health Insurance Program lived in families who filed federal income tax forms. This substantially exceeds the proportion of uninsured but eligible children who can be reached through many other outreach strategies. Federal lawmakers could cover uninsured children in these families by: (a) changing federal income tax forms so parents can identify their uninsured children and request coverage; (b) investing in information technology allowing data exchange between states and the Internal Revenue Service; and (c) letting states cover uninsured children if tax information shows they qualify.

Posted to Web: February 27, 2009Publication Date: February 01, 2009

Q&A: New Income and Poverty Statistics and the Social Safety Net (Opinion)
Gregory Acs, Linda J. Blumberg, Harry Holzer, Pamela J. Loprest, Jennifer Ehrle Macomber, Karin Martinson, Signe-Mary McKernan, Cynthia Perry, Caroline Ratcliffe, Margaret Simms, Margery Austin Turner, Shelley Waters Boots

The Census Bureau released its annual report on income, poverty, and health insurance coverage for the U.S. population on August 26, 2008. According to the report, median household income increased by 1.3 percent in 2007, while the overall poverty rate dipped slightly and the number and percentage of people without health insurance decreased. While the overall numbers were positive, not everyone shared in the economic gains. The number and percentage of children in poverty increased, and households in the lowest 40 percent of the income distribution had no significant income gains.

Posted to Web: August 27, 2008Publication Date: August 27, 2008

Access to and Use of Paid Sick Leave Among Low-Income Families With Children (Research Report)
Lisa Clemans-Cope, Cynthia Perry, Genevieve M. Kenney, Jennifer Pelletier, Matthew Pantell

The ability of employed parents to meet the health needs of their children may depend on their access to sick leave, especially for low-income workers. By examining access to paid sick leave and paid vacation using the 2003-2004 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, the authors find that low-income families are less likely to have access to paid leave, especially if the family lacks a full-time/full-year worker. Among children whose parents have access to paid sick leave, parents are more likely to take time away from work to care for themselves or others.

Posted to Web: August 15, 2008Publication Date: August 15, 2008

Making Work Pay II: Comprehensive Health Insurance for Low-Income Working Families (Series/New Safety Net)
Cynthia Perry, Linda J. Blumberg

Only 37 percent of adults in low-income working families had employer-sponsored health insurance and 42 percent had no coverage. Health care costs are also rapidly rising out of reach for even middle-income Americans. In this essay, Perry and Blumberg propose comprehensive reform that ensures coverage for everyone at every income level, while still encouraging work. Their proposals include state purchasing pools, individual mandates, and strategies for reducing health care costs.

Posted to Web: July 16, 2008Publication Date: July 16, 2008

Health Insurance for Low-Income Working Families - Summary (Series/New Safety Net)
Cynthia Perry, Linda J. Blumberg

Only 37 percent of adults in low-income working families had employer-sponsored health insurance and 42 percent had no coverage. Health care costs are also rapidly rising out of reach for even middle-income Americans. In this summary, Perry and Blumberg propose comprehensive reform that ensures coverage for everyone at every income level, while still encouraging work. Their proposals include state purchasing pools, individual mandates and strategies for reducing health care costs.

Posted to Web: July 16, 2008Publication Date: July 16, 2008

Preventive Care for Children in Low-Income Families: How Well Do Medicaid and State Children's Health Insurance Programs Do? (Research Report)
Cynthia Perry, Genevieve M. Kenney

Child health problems that are caused or exacerbated by health behaviors remain a leading cause of medical spending for children. We examined receipt of clinician advice in a sample of low-income children by insurance coverage. Publicly insured children were more likely than privately insured, full-year–uninsured children, and part-year–uninsured children to have had a preventive care visit in the past year, but regardless of health insurance group, many children went without preventive care. Those who were insured for an entire year through Medicaid or SCHIP did as well as or better than children who were privately insured for the year-and better than children who were not insured for some or all of the year-in terms of receiving preventive counseling. Rates of counseling were universally low, even for children who had a preventive care visit and children who would have particularly benefited from advice.

Posted to Web: February 06, 2008Publication Date: December 01, 2007

Differences in Pediatric Preventative Care Counseling by Provider Type (Article)
Cynthia Perry, Genevieve M. Kenney

Cynthia Perry and Genevieve Kenney explore the rates at which providers offer advice on health behaviors and injury prevention during preventive care visits. They find that pediatricians are more likely to advise about healthy eating than other physicians and nonphysicians, and they are also more likely than nonphysicians to advise about exercise, the harmful effects of parental smoking, proper safety restraints in a car, and use of a bicycle helmet. Regardless of provider type, rates of advice were low, leading the authors to conclude that many pediatric providers, particularly those not trained as pediatricians, are missing opportunities to advise about health behaviors and injury prevention.

Posted to Web: October 29, 2007Publication Date: June 04, 2007

Concerns about Parents Dropping Employer Coverage to Enroll in SCHIP Overlook Issues of Affordability (Policy Briefs/Timely Analysis of Health Policy Issues)
Stephen Zuckerman, Cynthia Perry

One of the more prominent concerns in the SCHIP reauthorization debate is that many children enrolling in the program could have been insured through their parents' employers. However, concern about parents dropping employer coverage to enroll their children in SCHIP typically ignores the affordability of that coverage. We show that families' spending burden is, on average, lower under public insurance than under employer-sponsored insurance (ESI), especially for the lowest-income families. For families in which children are covered by Medicaid or SCHIP, out-of-pocket spending is, on average, 4 to 5 percent of their income. However, for families in which children have ESI for a full year, the out-of-pocket spending burden is higher, ranging from 12.9 percent of income for families below 150 percent of the federal poverty level (FPL) to 6.1 percent for families between 250-400 percent of FPL.

Posted to Web: October 01, 2007Publication Date: September 26, 2007

Access to Employer-Sponsored Health Insurance among Low-Income Families : Who Has Access and Who Doesn't? (Research Report)
Lisa Clemans-Cope, Genevieve M. Kenney, Matthew Pantell, Cynthia Perry

Lack of health insurance can affect the health and productivity of workers as well as the health of workers’ families, especially for low-income families, who are more likely to have members in poor health. We show that about half of children in low-income families do not have access to employer-sponsored insurance (ESI). Among the families without access to ESI, public insurance fills some gaps among children, but parents remain uninsured at high rates. For these families, children are twice as likely—and parents are nearly three times as likely—to be uninsured compared to families with an ESI offer.

Posted to Web: September 11, 2007Publication Date: September 11, 2007

 

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