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Carol J. De Vita


Senior Fellow
Center on Nonprofits and Philanthropy

For nearly 20 years, De Vita has studied the role, capacity, and financial well-being of nonprofit organizations, including faith-based organizations, in low-income areas. She currently co-directs two evaluation studies that are assessing the implementation and performance of federal stimulus money received by the Strengthening Communities Fund (SCF) and the Community Services Block Grant (CSBG) programs. Other recent studies include: an assessment of the role of faith-based and community organizations in providing relief and recovery services after Hurricane Katrina; an evaluation of the American Red Cross Recovery Grant Program after the 9/11 attacks, and the diversity of nonprofit leadership in California and the Baltimore-Washington, D.C. region.

Ph.D., Social Welfare Policy, Brandeis University

1988-97: Senior Research Demographer and Director of Publications, Population Reference Bureau

Publications


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D.C. Out-of-School Time Programs Tackle Outcome Measures (Research Report)
Mary Kopczynski Winkler, Carol J. De Vita, Saunji Fyffe, Debra Natenshon

Funders and nonprofit leaders are increasingly looking for information that demonstrates the achievements of community-based programs. In this results-oriented environment, the Urban Institute, The Center for What Works, and the D.C. Children and Youth Investment Trust Corporation worked together to create a pilot program that developed and tested a series of outcome measures for out-of-school time (OST) programs. This brief describes the process followed and the results achieved. The pilot demonstrated that OST providers are eager to learn how to better manage their programs, keep young people engaged, and demonstrate their accomplishments. The challenge is to expand this work to all OST programs in the District and beyond.

Posted to Web: September 14, 2010Publication Date: September 01, 2010

Who Helps Public Schools? Public Education Support Organizations in 2010 (Research Report)
Erwin de Leon, Katie L. Roeger, Carol J. De Vita, Elizabeth T. Boris

There are more than 19,000 nonprofit organizations devoted to supporting public education in the United States. These organizations include booster clubs, parent-teacher groups, public education funds, scholarship funds, high school alumni associations, and others. This report assesses the current status of education support organizations; provides details on the activities, capacities, and resources of public education funds; and compares Public Education Network member organizations with other types of education funds. On the basis of a survey of public education funds and an analysis of the latest data available from the National Center for Charitable Statistics, the report identifies key similarities and differences among the groups.

Posted to Web: June 09, 2010Publication Date: June 09, 2010

Measuring Racial-Ethnic Diversity in the Baltimore-Washington Region's Nonprofit Sector (Research Report)
Carol J. De Vita, Katie L. Roeger

The nonprofit sector in the Baltimore-Washington region is undergoing a profound, albeit quiet, revolution driven by demographic change. The people and communities that nonprofits serve increasingly reflect a multiracial and multi-ethnic world, and a new generation of leaders will soon emerge as baby boomer executives retire. This report examines whether the Baltimore-Washington region’s nonprofit sector reflects the new demographic realities. The report, based on a representative sample of 501(c)(3) organizations, documents the extent to which the region’s nonprofit boards, staff, and executive leadership are racially and ethnically diverse. It also analyzes diversity by the organization’s size, type, and geographic location, and examines how the sector has been affected by the current economic downturn.

Posted to Web: March 31, 2010Publication Date: March 30, 2010

Good Intentions Aren't Enough (Commentary)
Carol J. De Vita

In an interview for Faith & Leadership, DeVita discusses the role of faith-based organizations in disaster relief and Katrina's lessons for relief in Haiti. Faith-based organizations are good at providing immediate relief, but have less capacity to support sustained recovery in areas devastated by natural disasters. Planning ahead, working with large, established organizations and connecting with local people are keys to successful relief efforts.

Posted to Web: February 26, 2010Publication Date: February 23, 2010

Community-Based Organizations and Immigrant Integration in the Washington, D.C., Metropolitan Area (Research Report)
Erwin de Leon, Matthew Maronick, Carol J. De Vita, Elizabeth T. Boris

This study examines immigrant integration through the lens of community-based organizations. Based on interviews with nonprofit leaders and an analysis of data from the National Center for Charitable Statistics, the study found that immigrant-serving nonprofits provide a wide range of programs and services to foreign-born communities which promote the social and political mobility of newcomers. Findings also suggest a potential spatial mismatch between immigrant-serving organizations and the people they serve. The organizations are concentrated in the metropolitan area while immigrant populations are growing in the outer suburbs. Moreover, different political and administrative structures and policies affect the ability of these nonprofits to serve their constituents.

Posted to Web: December 04, 2009Publication Date: November 01, 2009

Measuring Racial-Ethnic Diversity in California's Nonprofit Sector: An Overview (Research Brief)
Carol J. De Vita, Katie L. Roeger

This policy brief summarizes the findings of a larger report on racial-ethnic diversity in California's nonprofit sector (see www.urban.org/url.cfm?ID=411977). It documents the extent to which California's nonprofit boards, staff, and executive leadership are racially and ethnically diverse, and analyzes diversity by an organization's size, type, funding patterns, and geographic location within the state. The brief examines how California nonprofits with diverse leadership have been affected by the current economic downturn, and presents three models for measuring diversity using different definitions of organizational diversity.

Posted to Web: November 12, 2009Publication Date: November 10, 2009

Measuring Racial-Ethnic Diversity in California's Nonprofit Sector (Research Report)
Carol J. De Vita, Katie L. Roeger, Max Niedzwiecki

Decisionmakers in California and across the country are facing critical challenges related to diversity. But until now, there has not been a comprehensive picture of how California's nonprofit sector has responded to this demographic transition. This report, based on a representative sample of California's 501(c)(3) organizations, documents the extent to which California's nonprofit boards, staff, and executive leadership are racially and ethnically diverse. It analyzes diversity by an organization's size, type, funding patterns, and geographic location within the state, and examines how California nonprofits with diverse leadership have been affected by the current economic downturn. The report also presents three models for measuring diversity using different definitions of organizational diversity.

Posted to Web: November 12, 2009Publication Date: November 09, 2009

Central Louisiana in Focus (Research Report)
Katie L. Roeger, Carol J. De Vita

This series of fact sheets provides a quick overview of the nonprofit sector in each of the nine parishes that comprise Central Louisiana – Allen, Avoyelles, Catahoula, Grant, LaSalle, Natchitoches, Rapides, Vernon, and Winn. Each fact sheet provides information on the number of nonprofits and congregations found in the parish; the types of services offered; basic financial measures, such as total revenues, expenses, assets, and liabilities; sources of revenue; and a measure of fiscal health. The fact sheets also include basic demographic information for the parish, such as total population, median age, race-ethnic composition and median household income. A companion report, A Profile of Nonprofit Organizations in Central Louisiana, provides a detailed analysis of the size, scope, fiscal health, and other dimensions of the sector.

Posted to Web: August 17, 2009Publication Date: July 28, 2009

A Profile of Nonprofit Organizations in Central Louisiana (Research Report)
Carol J. De Vita, Katie L. Roeger

Nonprofit organizations in Central Louisiana are an integral part of community life, helping people in need and providing cultural and civic opportunities to local residents. Yet most people have only a vague idea of the number and types of nonprofits in the region or the financial resources needed to support and sustain this work. This report is a comprehensive study of Central Louisiana's nonprofit sector. It examines the size, scope, and financial underpinning of the sector, and explores the extent to which nonprofits and religious congregations collaborate with each other and with other groups. It also reports the challenges that nonprofit and faith-based leaders see as critical to the region. A companion report, Central Louisiana in Focus, provides a statistical fact sheet for each of the nine parishes in the region.

Posted to Web: August 17, 2009Publication Date: July 28, 2009

Trends in Charitable Giving in North Carolina and the Research Triangle 1997-2006 (Research Report)
Carol J. De Vita, Petya Kehayova

Charitable giving in North Carolina has been on the upswing for nearly ten years, but the economic downturn is affecting individuals' ability and willingness to give. Using tax returns stripped of personal identifiers, the report examines charitable giving by North Carolina tax payers and those in the Research Triangle. Overall, charitable giving by North Carolinians is higher than the national average both in terms of dollars given and the share of gross adjusted income given. Yet, despite its relatively high levels of income, Triangle residents give less to charity than the average Tar Heel. Even among high-income earners (those with adjusted gross income of $100,000 or more), Triangle residents give about the same amount in absolute dollars, on average, but about a half percentage point less than their statewide peers. Regional and county variations in giving suggest that fundraising appeals must be carefully targeted to be successful.

Posted to Web: May 22, 2009Publication Date: April 01, 2009

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