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Viewing 1-10 of 11. Most recent posts listed first.Next Page >>

Cost-Benefit Analysis of Reclaiming Futures (Research Report)
John Roman, Aaron Sundquist, Jeffrey A. Butts, Aaron Chalfin

In this study, we report the costs and benefits of the Reclaiming Futures initiative. The national evaluation of Reclaiming Futures found strong evidence that the systems change initiative created a foundation for improving substance abuse interventions for youth. Results from the stakeholder surveys found improvements in the target communities in treatment delivery and effectiveness, cooperation and information-sharing among youth service providers, and family involvement in youth care.

Posted to Web: March 30, 2010Publication Date: March 19, 2010

The Impact of Marital and Relationship Status on Social Outcomes for Returning Prisoners (Research Report)
Christy Visher, Carly Knight, Aaron Chalfin, John Roman

While a large body of empirical research indicates that marriage is associated with criminal activity, to date little research exists on the effects of relationship status on a population of offenders returning to their communities. This study uses data on over 650 former prisoners to examine the impact of relationships on recidivism, substance use, and employment during this critical period of re-entry. Findings suggest that marriage cut the odds of recidivism and drug use in half when compared to those in casual relationships.

Posted to Web: April 14, 2009Publication Date: February 18, 2009

Impact and Cost-Benefit Analysis of the Anchorage Wellness Court (Research Report)
John Roman, Aaron Chalfin, Jay Reid, Shannon Reid

The primary goal of this research is to estimate the costs and benefits of serving misdemeanor DUI offenders in the Anchorage Wellness Court (AWC), a specialized court employing principles of therapeutic jurisprudence. The Urban Institute conducted an impact and a cost-benefit analysis (CBA) to estimate the effectiveness of the AWC. The study focused on the impact of the program on reducing the prevalence and incidence of new criminal justice system contact. Costs were collected to estimate the opportunity cost of the AWC. Recidivism variables were monetized to estimate the benefits from crime reductions. Outcomes were observed at 24, 30, 36, and 48 months.

Posted to Web: August 06, 2008Publication Date: July 01, 2008

The DNA Field Experiment: Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of the Use of DNA in the Investigation of High-Volume Crimes (Research Report)
John Roman, Shannon Reid, Jay Reid, Aaron Chalfin, William Adams, Carly Knight

The study compared traditional crime solving to biological evidence techniques in hundreds of cases where biological evidence was available. When conventional investigative techniques were used, a suspect was identified 12 percent of the time, compared to 31 percent of the cases using DNA evidence. In eight percent of cases built on traditional evidence alone a suspect was arrested, compared to the 16 percent arrest rate in DNA cases. The average added cost for processing a single case with DNA evidence was about $1,397. Each additional arrest-an arrest that would not have occurred without DNA processing-cost $14,169.

Posted to Web: June 16, 2008Publication Date: April 01, 2008

To Treat or Not to Treat: Evidence on the Prospects of Expanding Treatment to Drug-Involved Offenders (Research Report)
Avi Bhati, John Roman, Aaron Chalfin

Despite a growing consensus among scholars that substance abuse treatment is effective in reducing recidivism, strict eligibility rules have limited the impact of current models of therapeutic jurisprudence on public safety. This research effort was aimed at providing policy makers some guidance on whether expanding this model to more drug-involved offenders is cost-beneficial. We find that roughly 1.5 million arrestees who are probably guilty (the population most likely to participate in court monitored substance abuse treatment) are currently at risk of drug dependence or abuse and that several million crimes could be averted if current eligibility limitations were suspended and all at-risk arrestees were treated.

Posted to Web: April 08, 2008Publication Date: March 28, 2008

The Cost of the Death Penalty in Maryland (Research Report)
John Roman, Aaron Chalfin, Aaron Sundquist, Carly Knight, Askar Darmenov

This study assesses the death penalty's costs to Maryland taxpayers by examining a sample of the 1,136 death-eligible murder cases occurring between 1978 and 1999. We find that an average capital-eligible case in which prosecutors did not seek the death penalty will cost approximately $1.1 million over the lifetime of the case. A capital-eligible case in which prosecutors unsuccessfully sought the death penalty will cost $1.8 million and a capital-eligible case resulting in a death sentence will cost approximately $3 million. In total, we forecast that the lifetime costs to Maryland taxpayers of these capitally-prosecuted cases will be $186 million.

Posted to Web: March 06, 2008Publication Date: March 01, 2008

Is There an iCrime Wave? (Research Brief)
John Roman, Aaron Chalfin

The recent increase in violent crime defies easy explanation, and many hypotheses have been put forward for debate. In this brief, we propose that the rise in violent offending and the explosion in the sales of iPods and other portable media devices is more than coincidental. We propose that, over the past two years, America may have experienced an iCrime wave.

Posted to Web: September 26, 2007Publication Date: September 01, 2007

The Costs and Benefits of Agricultural Crime Prevention (Research Report)
Aaron Chalfin, John Roman, Daniel P. Mears, Michelle L. Scott

Agricultural crime, including theft of farming-related commodities, supplies, and equipment, causes billions of dollars of losses each year to farmers, insurers, and consumers. Drawing on analyses of law enforcement, farm survey, site visit, and interview data, the Urban Institute and Florida State University evaluated the theory and impacts of a promising initiative in California—the Agricultural Crime, Technology, Information, and Operations Network (ACTION) project (www.agcrime.net)—aimed at addressing this problem. ACTION collects and analyzes agricultural crime data; encourages and enables information-sharing among law enforcement agencies and prosecutors within and across counties; educates the public and farmers about agricultural crime and how to combat it; marks equipment with owner applied numbers (OANs); and promotes aggressive law enforcement and prosecution. This policy brief describes the application of cost-benefit analysis to agricultural crime prevention programs, and shows that ACTION contributed to farmers investing more to protect their property.

Posted to Web: May 03, 2007Publication Date:

A Process and Impact Evaluation of the ACTION Program (Research Report)
Daniel P. Mears, Michelle L. Scott, Avi Bhati, John Roman, Aaron Chalfin, Jesse Jannetta

Agricultural crime, including theft of farming-related commodities, supplies, and equipment, causes billions of dollars of losses each year to farmers, insurers, and consumers. Drawing on analyses of law enforcement, farm survey, site visit, and interview data, the Urban Institute and Florida State University evaluated the theory and impacts of a promising initiative in California—the Agricultural Crime, Technology, Information, and Operations Network (ACTION) project—aimed at addressing this problem. ACTION collects and analyzes agricultural crime data; encourages and enables information-sharing among law enforcement agencies and prosecutors within and across counties; educates the public and farmers about agricultural crime and how to combat it; marks equipment with owner applied numbers (OANs); and promotes aggressive law enforcement and prosecution. ACTION's activities appear to have reduced victimization and to have increased agricultural crime arrests and prosecutions, recovery of stolen property, and farmers' investment in crime prevention. This report describes the study and findings in detail.

Posted to Web: May 02, 2007Publication Date: April 18, 2007

Policy, Theory, and Research Lessons from an Evaluation of an Agricultural Crime Prevention Program (Research Report)
Daniel P. Mears, Michelle L. Scott, Avi Bhati, John Roman, Aaron Chalfin, Jesse Jannetta

Agricultural crime, including theft of farming-related commodities, supplies, and equipment, causes billions of dollars of losses each year to farmers, insurers, and consumers. Drawing on analyses of law enforcement, farm survey, site visit, and interview data, the Urban Institute and Florida State University evaluated the theory and impacts of a promising initiative in California—the Agricultural Crime, Technology, Information, and Operations Network (ACTION) project—aimed at addressing this problem. ACTION collects and analyzes agricultural crime data; encourages and enables information-sharing among law enforcement agencies and prosecutors within and across counties; educates the public and farmers about agricultural crime and how to combat it; marks equipment with owner applied numbers (OANs); and promotes aggressive law enforcement and prosecution. ACTION's activities appear to have reduced victimization and to have increased agricultural crime arrests and prosecutions, recovery of stolen property, and farmers' investment in crime prevention. This policy brief summarizes the study's key findings and its policy, theory, and research recommendations.

Posted to Web: May 02, 2007Publication Date: April 18, 2007

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