Almost 9 percent of low-income mothers with young children experienced a major depressive episode in the past year. Even though depression is one of the most treatable mental illnesses, more than one-third of these women received no treatment.

Untreated parental depression poses risks for children’s cognitive, social, emotional, and behavioral development. It also raises the likelihood of abuse and neglect. Linking mothers with effective treatment for depression has the potential to help parents and improve children’s lives.

An important obstacle to effective treatment for low-income mothers is lack of insurance. But starting in 2014, Medicaid will cover many more low-income adults, creating potential pathways to treatment.

Join our discussion about maternal depression as a public health issue, the problems in providing services to low-income women with depression, and emerging opportunities.

Panelists

Olivia Golden, Institute fellow, Urban Institute (moderator)

Larke Huang, senior adviser, Office of Policy Planning and Innovation, and director, Office of Behavioral Health Equity, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Marla McDaniel, senior research associate, Center on Labor, Human Services, and Population, Urban Institute

Deborah Perry, associate professor, Center for Child and Human Development, Georgetown University

Resources

Speaker Biographies
Executive Summary: Depression in Parents, Parenting, and Children: Opportunities to Improve Identification, Treatment, and Prevention
Book: Depression in Parents, Parenting, and Children: Opportunities to Improve Identification, Treatment, and Prevention
Linking Depressed Mothers to Effective Services
Center for Medicaid and CHIP Services: Coverage and Service Design Opportunities for Individuals with Mental Illness and Substance Use Disorders

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