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Economy and Taxes

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Clear nonpartisan analysis of fiscal and tax policy enables policymakers and the public to weigh competing theories on how to end the country’s economic crisis. Urban Institute researchers evaluated key components of the stimulus package and analyzed the tax proposals in the president’s budget. Warning decisionmakers about the unsustainable fiscal course ahead, our experts propose ways to control deficits and reform the entitlement programs that drive up spending. Read more.

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The Debt Ceiling Deal, the "Super Committee," and Retirement Programs

 
 
1040

Clear nonpartisan analysis of fiscal and tax policy enables policymakers and the public to weigh competing theories on how to end the country’s economic crisis. Urban Institute researchers evaluated key components of the stimulus package and analyzed the tax proposals in the president’s budget. Warning decisionmakers about the unsustainable fiscal course ahead, our experts propose ways to control deficits and reform the entitlement programs that drive up spending. Read more.

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The Tax Reform That Just Won't Die and Shouldn't (Article)
Leonard E. Burman

This paper provides an historical overview of tax reform with an eye toward identifying conditions that would make successful reform plausible in the near future. Burman begins by analyzing the environment that led to tax reform in 1986 and posits that successful reform would require strong leadership from the White House, bipartisan support, and a new source that would make possible substantial income tax rate cuts—all of this while addressing the concerns of Republicans that new revenues would fuel a growth in government and of Democrats about progressivity. He argues that the new revenue source should be a value-added tax with proceeds earmarked to pay for government health care. This could slow healthcare spending because the tax would stimulate efforts to find cost savings, would result in a more efficient revenue system, and would go a long way towards addressing our long term budget imbalances.

Posted to Web: April 24, 2014Publication Date: April 24, 2014

Impact of the Great Recession and Beyond: Disparities in Wealth Building by Generation and Race (Occasional Paper)
Signe-Mary McKernan, Caroline Ratcliffe, C. Eugene Steuerle, Sisi Zhang

This paper uses over two decades of Survey of Consumer Finances data and a pseudo-panel technique to measure the impact of the Great Recession on wealth relative to the counterfactual of what wealth would have been given wealth accumulation trajectories. Our regression-adjusted synthetic cohort-level models find that the Great Recession reduced the wealth of American families by 28.5 percent—nearly double the magnitude of previous pre-post mean descriptive estimates and double the magnitude of any previous recession since the 1980s. The housing market was only part of the story; all major wealth components fell as a result of the Great Recession.

Posted to Web: April 22, 2014Publication Date: April 22, 2014

Housing Finance At A Glance: A Monthly Chartbook: April 2014 (Commentary)
Laurie Goodman, Ellen Seidman, Jim Parrott, Jun Zhu, Wei Li, Bing Bai, Pamela Lee, Taz George, Maia Woluchem, Alison Rincon

At A Glance, the Housing Finance Policy Center's monthly chartbook, provides timely metrics on the state of the housing market and examines public policy's role in housing finance. April's issue includes a special quarterly feature on GSE loan performance and new numbers on the Federal Reserve's activity in the mortgage market.

Posted to Web: April 15, 2014Publication Date: April 15, 2014

State Economic Monitor: April 2014 (Series/State Economic Monitor)
Norton Francis, Brian David Moore

The latest edition of the Tax Policy Center's State and Local Finance Initiative's State Economic Monitor finds the economic recovery continues to improve slowly. No state unemployment rate increased from last year in February but long term unemployment remains a problem and is above average in most states. The Monitor reviews the health of various aspects of state economies, including employment, housing, state finances, and economic growth. This edition also reports state general fund revenue forecasts for fiscal year 2015.

Posted to Web: April 14, 2014Publication Date: April 14, 2014

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