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Publications by Margery Austin Turner on Housing Markets and Choice

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Housing Discrimination against Racial and Ethnic Minorities 2012: Full Report (Research Report)
Margery Austin Turner, Robert Santos, Diane K. Levy, Douglas A. Wissoker, Claudia Aranda, Rob Pitingolo

The Department of Housing and Urban Development, in partnership with the Urban Institute, has released its 2012 Housing Discrimination Study: Housing Discrimination Against Racial and Ethnic Minorities. The study's findings confirm a hard truth: that America's long journey to end housing discrimination remains unfinished. Real estate agents and rental housing providers recommend and show fewer available homes and apartments to minorities than equally qualified whites.

Posted to Web: June 11, 2013Publication Date: June 11, 2013

Housing Discrimination against Racial and Ethnic Minorities 2012: Executive Summary (Summary)
Margery Austin Turner, Robert Santos, Diane K. Levy, Douglas A. Wissoker, Claudia Aranda, Rob Pitingolo

The Department of Housing and Urban Development, in partnership with the Urban Institute, has released its 2012 Housing Discrimination Study: Housing Discrimination Against Racial and Ethnic Minorities. The study's findings confirm a hard truth: that America's long journey to end housing discrimination remains unfinished. Real estate agents and rental housing providers recommend and show fewer available homes and apartments to minorities than equally qualified whites.

Posted to Web: June 11, 2013Publication Date: June 11, 2013

How Would Reforming the Mortgage Interest Deduction Affect the Housing Market? (Research Brief)
Margery Austin Turner, Eric Toder, Rolf Pendall, Claudia Ayanna Sharygin

Opponents of MID reform warn that reducing the deduction would undermine the value of owner-occupied homes and impede the recovery of the depressed housing market. The best available evidence predicts far less dire effects and suggests that some reforms could actually bolster the housing market recovery. However, the results are far from definitive. As debate continues, the Urban Institute plans to further explore behavioral and market changes, strengthening the evidence upon which policymakers can rely.

Posted to Web: March 26, 2013Publication Date: March 26, 2013

Benefits of Living in High-Opportunity Neighborhoods (Research Report)
Margery Austin Turner, Austin Nichols, Jennifer Comey

The Moving to Opportunity (MTO) demonstration tested the long-term benefits of helping poor families move from severely distressed housing projects to low-poverty neighborhoods. Evaluation results recently released by HUD find significant gains in health but not in employment, incomes, or educational attainment among experimental families. One possible reason gains were limited is that few families spent much more than a year living in high-opportunity neighborhoods. This brief summarizes new evidence that the MTO families that lived longer in neighborhoods with lower poverty and higher education levels did achieve better outcomes in work and school, as well as in health.

Posted to Web: September 07, 2012Publication Date: September 07, 2012

Why Housing Choice and Mobility Matter (Commentary)
Margery Austin Turner, Susan J. Popkin

HUD's proposal for transforming federal rental assistance expands subsidy recipients' freedom to choose where to live. This essay summarizes research evidence showing that: 1) project-based housing programs limit families' choices about where to live; 2) families benefit when they move with vouchers; 3) assisted mobility programs further expand families' options; and 4) "opportunity moves" can improve families' life chances. Although many families living in federally subsidized housing projects will choose to stay (especially if new investments improve the quality and safety of these communities), expanding opportunities for families to move strengthens federal housing policy by improving the well-being of assisted households.

Posted to Web: August 17, 2010Publication Date: August 17, 2010

Building Environmentally Sustainable Communities (Series/What Works Collaborative)
Vicki Been, Mary K. Cunningham, Ingrid Gould Ellen, Joe Parilla, Margery Austin Turner, Sheryl Verlaine Whitney, Ken Zimmerman, Adam Gordon, Aaron Yowell

The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) has decided to include two key goals in all of its programs: encouraging sustainable communities and enhancing access to opportunity for lower-income people and people of color. This paper examines the relationship between these two goals through a literature review and an original empirical analysis of how these goals interact at the neighborhood and metropolitan area levels. We also offer policy recommendations for HUD.

Posted to Web: May 14, 2010Publication Date: April 01, 2010

Promoting Neighborhood Diversity: Benefits, Barriers, and Strategies (Discussion Papers)
Margery Austin Turner, Lynette A. Rawlings

Despite substantial progress since passage of the Fair Housing Act four decades ago, neighborhoods remain highly segregated by race and ethnicity. This paper summarizes existing research evidence on both the costs of segregation and the potential benefits of neighborhood diversity. It uses decennial census data to show that a growing share of US neighborhoods are racially and ethnically diverse, but that low-income African Americans in particular remain highly concentrated in predominantly minority neighborhoods. Because the dynamics that sustain segregation today are complex, strategies for overcoming them must address not only discrimination, but information gaps, affordability constraints, prejudice, and fear.

Posted to Web: September 09, 2009Publication Date: August 01, 2009

Vibrant Neighborhoods, Successful Schools (Series/What Works Collaborative)
Margery Austin Turner, Alan Berube

Every parent recognizes the inextricable connections between where we live and the quality of our children’s education. Although public policies have historically contributed to disparities in both neighborhood affordability and school quality, federal programs focused on affordable housing rarely take public schools into account and school officials typically assume that they have no influence over housing patterns. This paper focuses on four principles regarding the vitality and performance of schools and communities, discussing opportunities for constructive policy interventions, summarizing what we know about their likely effectiveness, and recommending next steps for the Department of Housing and Urban Development and the Department of Education.

Posted to Web: July 28, 2009Publication Date: July 01, 2009

Residential Segregation and Low-Income Working Families (Discussion Papers/Low Income Working Families)
Margery Austin Turner, Karina Fortuny

Historically, residential segregation constrained where minorities could live, contributing to disparities in education, employment, and wealth. Researchers interested in the well-being and future prospects of low-income working families have not yet explored how their residential patterns may vary across racial and ethnic lines or considered the implications of these patterns. Therefore, this paper explores differences in neighborhood characteristics among white, black, and Hispanic low-income working families. The findings suggest that policies aimed at reducing the persistent disadvantages facing minority low-income working families need to address the ways the neighborhoods in which minorities live may be compounding these disadvantages.

Posted to Web: March 04, 2009Publication Date: February 01, 2009

Quality Schools and Healthy Neighborhoods: A Research Report (Research Report)
Margery Austin Turner, Jennifer Comey, Elizabeth Guernsey, Barika X. Williams

Over the last decade, the District of Columbia implemented bold steps to improve its public schools while also experiencing population growth, property value increases, and strong city fiscal health. But its child population (0-17 years old) remained essentially the same and a dwindling share of the city’s children was attending the public schools. This research report describes in-depth the relationships between education, housing, and neighborhood development in the District of Columbia, and it is the basis for the subsequent policy research report, Quality Schools, Healthy Neighborhoods, and the Future of DC, which outlines recommended policies to make the District a more family-friendly city.

Posted to Web: October 09, 2008Publication Date: September 01, 2008

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