URBAN INSTITUTE

Expert

Carlos Martín
Expert

Carlos Martín

Senior Fellow

As a scholar, I know that our housing and communities are more than bricks and mortar. Yet, I also know that they play a critical role in shaping our personal health and wealth along with the relationships with our neighbors and our environment. Urban looks at the totality of our urban contexts—including what we can see, touch, and build.

Biography

Carlos Martín is a senior fellow in the Metropolitan Housing and Communities Policy Center at the Urban Institute, where he leads research and evaluations on the physical qualities of housing and communities, and the industry that builds them.

Martín, a trained architect and construction engineer, uses his technical training to connect the nuts and bolts of housing—technology, design, workers, and materials—to its social outcomes for residents and the cities in which they live. His areas of expertise include green housing policies, disaster mitigation, low-income housing quality, the construction workforce, and development regulations. He has experience with descriptive analysis, qualitative implementation studies, evaluation technical assistance, and experimental evaluations for public, nonprofit, and philanthropic clients in the United States and abroad. Publications from his past research projects include Housing Recovery on the Gulf Coast, Phase II; The Feasibility of Developing a National Parcel Database; and The State of the Residential Construction Industry.

Before joining Urban, Martín was assistant staff vice president at the National Association of Home Builders for Construction Codes and Standards, SRP Professor for Energy and the Environment at Arizona State University's Del E. Webb School of Construction and School of Architecture, and coordinator for the US Department of Housing and Urban Development's Partnership for Advancing Technology in Housing.

Martin received his BSAD in architecture from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and his MS and PhD in civil and environmental engineering from Stanford University.