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Children and Youth

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State Mental Health Systems for Children: A Review of the Literature and Available Data Sources (Research Report)
Stacey McMorrow, Embry M. Howell

States play an important role in serving children with a need for mental health services. In order to improve the mental health care system for this vulnerable population, it is necessary to better understand the need for mental health services, their availability, and their effectiveness across states. This report reviews the recent literature on children’s mental health services and examines a wide range of data sources for state-based analysis. It considers the feasibility of producing a comprehensive evaluation of state mental health systems for children and discusses the potential limitations of such an analysis.

Posted to Web: September 07, 2010Publication Date: August 25, 2010

Housing Assistance in Making Connections Neighborhoods (Policy Briefs/Metropolitan Housing and Communities)
G. Thomas Kingsley, Christopher Hayes

This brief examines the scope and composition of housing assistance being provided through HUD programs to residents of the 10 neighborhoods that have been a part of the Annie E. Casey Foundation's Making Connections initiative. It also describes selected characteristics of the families that receive housing assistance and how their circumstances changed between surveys conducted in 2002/03 and 2005/06 in comparison to unassisted renters and homeowners living in these neighborhoods. At the latter date, the average share of eligible households that received assistance was 25 percent, the same as the national average, but there was considerable variation across sites.

Posted to Web: August 30, 2010Publication Date: December 01, 2008

Violence Prevention in Schools: A Case Study of the Thurgood Marshall Academy Public Charter High School (Research Report)
Jocelyn Fontaine, Sara Debus-Sherrill, P. Mitchell Downey, Samantha S. Lowry

This report is based on research conducted by the Urban Institute's Justice Policy Center on the violence prevention activities taking place at the Thurgood Marshall Academy Public Charter High School during the 2008-2009 school year. Based on an assessment of the school's violence prevention approach using qualitative and quantitative data from stakeholder interviews, field observations, programmatic records, and surveys with students and faculty, this report includes: a logic model of the school's violence prevention approach; detailed information on each of the violence prevention activities within the violence prevention approach and how they compare to national best practices; student and faculty perceptions of the school climate and the violence prevention approach; and recommendations to the school administrators on how to strengthen their violence prevention approach based on the assessment findings. The report concludes with brief remarks on next steps in school violence prevention research.

Posted to Web: August 27, 2010Publication Date: August 01, 2010

Violence Prevention at Thurgood Marshall Academy Public Charter High School (Summary)
Jocelyn Fontaine, Sara Debus-Sherrill, P. Mitchell Downey, Samantha S. Lowry

This summary brief is based on research conducted by the Urban Institute's Justice Policy Center on the violence prevention activities taking place at the Thurgood Marshall Academy Public Charter High School during the 2008-2009 school year. Researchers from the Justice Policy Center conducted an assessment of the school's violence prevention activities using qualitative and quantitative data from stakeholder interviews, programmatic records, and surveys with students and faculty. This brief provides an overview of Thurgood Marshall Academy's violence prevention approach; a more detailed report on the full assessment will follow in Summer 2010.

Posted to Web: August 16, 2010Publication Date: April 01, 2010

The Health Crisis for CHA Families: CHA Families and the Plan for Transformation Series (Policy Briefs/Metropolitan Housing and Communities)
David Price, Susan J. Popkin

The HOPE VI Panel Study research has highlighted that many residents of distressed public housing face severe health challenges. Our research shows that respondents' well-being has improved in important ways—they now live in housing that is substantially higher-quality and in neighborhoods that are dramatically safer. However, in this brief, we present findings that show that despite these improvements, respondents' health has continued to deteriorate rapidly; the level of reported health problems in 2009 are stunning, and the mortality rate is shockingly high.

Posted to Web: August 11, 2010Publication Date: August 11, 2010

CHA Transformation: Children and Youth: CHA Families and the Plan for Transformation Series (Policy Briefs/Metropolitan Housing and Communities)
Megan Gallagher

Child outcomes have been a special focus for the HOPE VI Panel Study since the baseline study in 2001. On one hand, children are the most likely to benefit in important ways from improved housing quality such as exposure to lead paint or mold. On the other hand, moving can disrupt their education and friendships and put older youth at risk for conflict with local gangs. This brief examines how relocation has affected the well-being of the youngest former Madden/Wells residents. We find that these youth are doing relatively well; however, there are some reasons for concern, especially for boys.

Posted to Web: August 11, 2010Publication Date: August 11, 2010

The Limits of Relocation: Employment and Family Well-Being among Former Madden/Wells Residents: CHA Families and the Plan for Transformation Series (Policy Briefs/Metropolitan Housing and Communities)
Diane K. Levy

Despite many gains in quality of life standards, the HOPE VI program and related efforts have been less successful in helping residents move toward self-sufficiency. In recent years, the CHA has increased its efforts to promote self-sufficiency for its residents, through both its FamilyWorks case management services and Opportunity Chicago, connecting residents to the labor force. In this brief, we explore what has happened to Madden/Wells respondents' economic status since 2009. Our analysis indicates that although employment rates have not increased, respondents have experienced some gains in economic well-being. However, respondents continue to face considerable economic hardship.

Posted to Web: August 11, 2010Publication Date: August 11, 2010

Escaping the Hidden War: Safety Is the Biggest Gain for CHA Families: CHA Families and the Plan for Transformation Series (Policy Briefs/Metropolitan Housing and Communities)
Susan J. Popkin, David Price

In 1999, when the Chicago Housing Authority’s (CHA) Plan for Transformation began, the agency’s housing developments were notorious for being among the most dangerous places in the nation. This brief explores whether the safety gains for early relocates have been sustained and whether those who moved later have benefited equally— because these residents tended to be among the most vulnerable, there was good reason to think that they would not fare as well. We find that almost all former residents are now living in safer conditions and that improved safety and quality of life has been the greatest benefit.

Posted to Web: August 11, 2010Publication Date: August 11, 2010

Transformed Housing Major Improvements in CHA Residents' Quality of Life: CHA Families and the Plan for Transformation Series (Policy Briefs/Metropolitan Housing and Communities)
Larry Buron, Susan J. Popkin

A main goal of the HOPE VI program was to improve public housing by replacing failed developments with healthy and safe communities that offer a better quality of life for residents. This brief explores whether the safety gains for early relocates have been sustained and whether those who moved later have benefited equally— because these residents tended to be among the most vulnerable, there was good reason to think that they would not fare as well. We find that almost all former residents are now living in safer conditions and that improved safety and quality of life has been the greatest benefit of the Plan for Transformation for CHA residents.

Posted to Web: August 11, 2010Publication Date: August 11, 2010

After Wells: Where Are the Residents Now?: CHA Families and the Plan for Transformation Series (Policy Briefs/Metropolitan Housing and Communities)
Larry Buron, Susan J. Popkin

Eight years after the Madden/Wells redevelopment started, this brief presents what has happened to the original residents, including the type of housing assistance they received and where they lived in 2009. Despite a number of challenges, we found that by 2009, all of the residents had relocated and nearly one in five former Madden/Wells residents was living in a new mixed-income housing development. Most of the former Madden/Wells residents reported that their current housing and neighborhood was better than Madden/Wells. However, only a minority lived in economically or racially diverse neighborhoods that offer real opportunities for themselves and their children.

Posted to Web: August 11, 2010Publication Date: August 11, 2010

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